PD & the ‘Kamehameha Effect’: By Maria De Leon

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Have you ever heard your loved ones complain or say that when you are up and about in public you seem different? They may describe you as lively, happy, and energized but moving better even. However, they gasp, as my husband often does, asking why can’t we simply have that kind of motivation when we are at home rather than just sit around like bumps on a log?

Not long ago when my family and I traveled to Hawaii for vacation my husband finally put a term to this positive effect of well-being that ensues when confronted with something utterly delightful to us. The ‘Kamehameha effect’ as my husband lovingly has coined it, is the end result of a natural boost of dopamine in our brain’s when confronted with pleasurable, enjoyable things. After hours of touring the island, there I was barely able to walk, shuffling, feeling stiff all over particularly in my lower back which was beginning to hurt down to my feet. I was choking on my own saliva and was beginning to lose my voice. When suddenly we came upon the current Supreme Court of Hawaii – also known as Aliiolani Hale building which has in its courtyard a statue of King Kamehameha I which is facing Lolani Palace. At the site of this grand structure I became so ecstatic since it happens to be the headquarters of Commander Garret and his Hawaii 5-0 unit. Seems like within minutes, I was no longer stiff, shuffling or choking. Husband was astonished at the effect calling it the ‘Kamehameha effect’ and still teases me about this every chance he gets. IMG_1866

He insists that this effect is purely is psychological and wishes I could summon it at will. However, although it has a psychological component is not that easy. It is instead a chemical reaction that takes place in our brains once ignited by exterior forces. The ‘Kamehameha effect’ is one that can be seen even in groups of Parkinson’s people at the same time if united by same outside force as was the case in New Orleans when the Saints won the Super bowl in 2010. According to Dr. Georgia Lea, a neurologists and assistant Neurology professor at the Oschsner Institute in NOLA, that during the super bowl championship all her PD patients who were fans of the SAINT’s suddenly were cured for hours to days!

This is the ‘Kamehameha effect’ at its core – ignite our own happy endogenous neurochemicals to bring forth dramatic improvement in our PD symptoms.
Although, this effect is not a switch which can be turned ‘on’ and ‘off’ at will, there are things we can do to promote the repeated occurrence of this phenomena by doing things which brings us joy, passion, love, gratitude and satisfaction. As one of my favorite literary authors Gabriel Garcia Marquez would say; “there is no medicine to cure what happiness cannot.”
Go ahead find your passion and unleash the ‘Kamehameha effect

@copyright2018
all rights reserved by Maria De Leon

What I have been surprised to discover while living with Parkinson’s disease? By Maria De Leon

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The other day, I dreamt of God above – He smiled and said: ‘don’t worry, your faith is strong; you know you have been here before. Just gaze upon my face and everything shall be alright.’ I smiled at HIM and softly uttered a broken Hallelujah! – Alleluia. Alleluia
Although, my faith IS strong and has grown immensely over the last decade somedays it seems that the dark clouds in life want to hang on just a bit longer than usual putting all our beliefs to the test.
This seems to be the case for me over the last month.

So, I had to remind myself of how far I have come and all the challenges I have endured in the past which have only served to make me stronger. I like to think of the peaks and valleys we have gone through in our life as a mechanism to help us get through things faster and with greater ease. (Just like the brain network is connected via myelinated sheaths which help disseminate information quicker from one area to another- if we would interrupt the myelin, information would surely get delayed and we might even find ourselves stuck. Such are our past experiences, the more we have overcome the greater ease we have of moving forward…)

I have learned that God is strongest when I am weak.
I have learned that I am much stronger than I once thought and much more resilient than I ever gave myself credit for. I thought I would never survive the first diagnosis of a chronic illness, nor giving up my practice. Yet, here I stand …
Despite years of trying to hide my physical flaws, I have learned to embrace those blemishes, scars, and all. I have learned to focus on my most attractive features which are my smile and my “Spanish” eyes.
I have learned to love myself strengths and weaknesses. After all beauty begins when we first decide to love ourselves. At times, we must learn to turn our weaknesses into strengths. For instance, once upon a time I was extremely shy and afraid of speaking in public (hard to believe I know). I would become paralyzed with fear of being judged. These days however, I embrace it fully. Public speaking has been a source of great joy in my life as I seem to have become the voice for women with Parkinson’s disease and other chronic illnesses.
I have learned that we all have the inner fortitude to do what you could not do before- I am learning to wait in silence and developing beaucoup patience!
I have learned that you will feel what you did not before- sympathy, empathy, kindness, love, gratitude…
I have become knowledgeable on things I never knew.
I have also learned that inner beauty never fades.
I love being a mom.
I am creative after all.
I am a trendsetter and fashionista at heart.
I am excited about living life to the fullest.
I cherish my time with my girlfriends.
Beauty and inspiration come from places we least expect.
All women are strong beautiful and able and we were fiercely made for a time such as this.
So go ahead find your passion and bring out your inner beauty by discovering new horizons and gifts within yourself. Despite what you may be facing today- you are not alone, you are loved, and this too shall pass! You just have to hold on long enough and keep the faith.

@copyright2018
all rights reserved by Maria De Leon

Risk of Melanoma in PD in Women especially those of a Darker Hue. By Maria De León

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“The summer knows….”

In many parts of the world the heat index is beginning to rise making it feel like summer although summer is officially a few weeks away. Summer means freedom, happiness, ocean breeze, long days and sand between my toes. However, it also reminds me of the ways we must take care of ourselves to enjoy life to the fullest. Even though having sunshine is a great thing we must have balance like everything in our lives. Especially for those of us who have PD and are women are at higher risk by simple fact that not only PD increases risk of melanoma but melanoma is the second – most common form of cancer in women ages 15-29. Plus, according to some surveys it is increasing faster in our gender than in men of same age.

My very first experience as an intern of having to comfort someone with cancer diagnosis in their terminal stage was a young Hispanic man who was about to lose fiancée to metastatic melanoma. This was a devastating moment in my life as well since I had to pronounce dead someone who not only was Hispanic but of my same young age.
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Little did I know then that over the next few decades I would be diagnosed with melanoma a few times already? Fortunately, all 3 times have been caught in first stages where resection was all that was required. However, as a doctor I know that having a history of certain cancers like melanoma are always something to consider when new symptoms arise for these cancers re highly malignant and can spread to almost any part of the body particularly the nervous system.
Now that I have PD, the risk of developing melanoma is greater for me and all people with PD. but, especially for those who have family and personal history of the same. Sadly, for those of us who are Hispanic (who by the way have higher risk of PD) have a higher rate of developing melanoma than two decades ago. Apparently, those of us who have darker skin tone need better sunscreens or perhaps need to begin applying sunscreen. There might be a misconception in our culture that not having pale skin somehow protects us from skin cancers but nothing is further from the truth. Melanin does offer some protection but not nearly enough. IMG_0818

I for instance I don’t tan, I simply burn with minimal exposure to UV rays. I discovered this purely by serendipity one summer at the beach. I had applied sunscreen to my shoulders and face primarily, as most Hispanic women tend to do, but never reapplied by that evening I was swollen like a big toad primarily in my face with glistening puffy water filled bags under my eyes and swollen lips almost disfiguring. Never mind the pain, I was glowing like I had received some form of radiation where even my hair was three shades lighter with only a few hours of sun exposure. This is when I remembered how my grandfather always insisted I wear gloves, hat and long sleeves in the sun…why had I not listened this time? Too busy being young and carefree. For weeks later I simply peeled.
Now even though I love the sun and beach I make sure I use the necessary protection. However, many minority women have not taken heed of the dangers of sun exposure. Plus the fact that among Hispanics, blacks and Indian women melanomas tend to occur in inconspicuous places not usually exposed to the sun. As was my case 2 out of three were not in sun exposed regions of my body. I also lost an Indian friend at young age due to metastatic melanoma which had started in her groin area. Thus by time of detection it had already spread.

Subsequently according to the Journal of the American academy of Dermatology nearly half of black women and a third of Hispanics are diagnosed with this disease in late stages compare to less than a third in white women. Thus fatality is higher in these groups. The question remains is there a biological difference in genetics causing greater risk? Perhaps! But the presentation in soles, palms, and nail beds make it harder to detect, diagnose, and treat appropriately for many doctors might not think melanoma since not directly exposed to sun. Here again the question of healthcare disparity comes into play. Are they going longer without diagnosis because of poor access to care or physician bias? Much more research is needed in this area.

The truth is that we all need to remember to use sunscreen to protect our skin from harmful UV rays especially if you are in the minority groups.Perhaps using sunscreens that leave our skins white and pasty might not be an appealing thing rather serve as a deterrent to many since it is aesthetically unpleasing; especially for those of us who have darker skin. Of course the best sunscreen is one that is used regularly!
Fortunately, the cosmetic industry has taken notice of the need for diverse products which can be used by various groups. Besides sunscreens many cosmetics now have an SPF protection.

How to protect yourself and diminish risk of melanoma:

We may not be able to do anything to avoid getting PD or other chronic illnesses but we sure can do something to prevent skin cancer.IMG_0857

• Use Cosmetics with SPF protection
• Frequent skin checkups especially in winter and in the nude – whole body, if no insurance visit aad.org for list of free SPOTme skin cancer screenings in your state.
• Self-inspection especially of inconspicuous areas – ask partner to help
• Wear gloves if driving in sun
• Use SPF protective garments like bathing suits/hats
• Avoid shellac use of nails routinely because this is applying UV light
• Avoid sun tanning (tanning booths) use instead bronzers than can be sprayed or applied. Many cosmetic brand s offer great products
• Don’t forget your eyes? Wear shades with UV protection
• Apply sunscreen vigorously multiple times don’t forget toes, hands and feet. Must have one with zinc oxide, also avobenzone and oxybenzone but these can be greasy. Look at screen stars which can be friendlier to women of darker skin color
1. Apply one ounce of SPF 45or higher (minimum 30) enough to fill shot glass or golf ball size at least 30minutes before going outside or in the water
2. Reapply every 2 hours or immediately after heavy perspiration or swimming

• Use moisturizers like oil of Olay (my favorite) or Neutrogena both which have SPF.
• If you are a woman with dark skin watch out for sore that won’t heal, patches of rough and dry skin (sounds like I have to go to dermatologist asap), watch for dark lines around finger and toe nails, look for spots on hands, feet, lower legs, groin, mouth, lips buttocks and scalp.
• Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate
After being in sun use some aloe Vera sap all over the exposed body this is soothing and healing.

Have a lovely summer! Soak up the sunshine but don’t forget to be good to yourself and your skin…you will be grateful you did.
IMG_2288

Source:
Douglas Deborah. (S.O.S) the Oprah magazine June 2018 9(6):109-113

@copyright 2018
All rights reserved by Maria De Leon

Need for Ongoing Affordable Access to Medical Care : by Maria De León

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I am a physician with many friends and colleagues still attempting to practice medicine throughout the country. It is particularly difficult for those who have chosen to remain in rural areas like the one I live in.  Due to the current hostile changes that have taken place in recent years, many physicians have been forced to move to the city to join academia.  Subsequently, we the patients are the ones bearing the brunt of the cuts and loss of specialist in many areas throughout the country.  With these changes patients are now forced to travel farther many miles to find a especially a specialist which believe me is not an easy feat to do as the disease progresses and also as our capacity to drive diminishes.

Moreover, those physicians who are truly committed to patient care and remain not just in the field but in areas where there is a need quickly find themselves overwhelmed, frustrates, on the verge of a burnout. Why ? I believe this one of the few professions in which the expert does not only lack autonomy but has to constantly fight with everyone to be able to do what he/she was trained to do and what he/ she deems best for the patient. No wonder 42% of all doctors are facing burnout and symptoms of depression, to make matters worst nearly 1/2 of those physicians are neurologists! With the increase in Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s dementia, and stroke in the aging population, we simply cannot afford to lose any more specialists.

Not only do we need to continue encouraging the US Congress to increase funding for research to halt these diseases but also provide adequate compensation for physicians managing these extremely complex entities, as well as provide funding and make necessary changes to the laws so that we can have tele-neurology availability  independent of where the patient or provider lives in the country. This form of care is essential for those that are too sick to travel, unable to drive, or have no other means of seeing a specialist because non exists within their state. The need for tele-neurology/telemedicine has become more pressing than ever before as we have seen this past year as several major catastrophe natural disasters have left many people stranded and afraid and without their much needed medications and access to medical care. thus, increasing morbidity and mortality in the chronically ill.

Another way we can decrease the stress level in our specialist and healthcare providers is getting rid of unnecessary red tape/bureaucracy. One example of this is allowing doctors autonomy to manage their patients medications as they see fit. Nothing creates more work and frustration,  for both patient and doctor than having to waste valuable time in getting pre-authorization and pre-approval of medications which have not been altered in years due to patients stability. of course if i went much longer without medication, I would no longer be stable ! This happened last week when ice storm hit 1/2 of country. Subsequently many offices including doctors and insurance companies were closed for days.

Meanwhile patients like me who desperately need their medications to continue functioning could not get a refill or even purchase a few til doctors were able to be contacted because price of each pill was nearly $100 ($3,000 for month supply- who can afford this?). It took me 5 days to get my medication and that’s only because I am a physician who could talk to her friend and to insurance  review committee without having to wait for medical records and could sit for hours on phone waiting to speak to someone otherwise it would have taken much longer given the circumstances. Many times, however, people that are sick neither have the savvyness to know who to call or dispute claim and/ or they lack the time, and energy required to carry out such feats. All I could think was that many people (such as doctor, pharmacist) were wasting valuable resources on me  trying to get a medicine i have been on for a decade when there are people out there who truly needed help because they were having problems and physicians offices closed, etc. walking thehalls

Sadly, as the problems and complexities increase in the field of  neurosciences/ and incidence of progressiveness diseases like PD augment, doctors and patients will continue to be stretched to their limits until someone breaks from pure physical and emotional exhaustion. Thus, I encourage everyone once again to contact their Congressional Representatives to help improve not only our quality of life by funding research ( which will not only help patients but also  provide salaries for clinicians who are doing research), the Raise Act (passed recently to help caregivers with financial burden), and telemedicine. Without your voice demanding  healthcare changes, there can be no hope for patients with chronic neurological illnesses to live better, healthier lives while maintaining access to their own specialists.

Join in me in March In DC as we (MJFOX public policy forum 2018) make our way to Capitol Hill to advocate for these salient issues. See you there!

Sources:

https://www.medscape.com/slideshow/2018-lifestyle-burnout-depression-6009235

copyright@2018

all rights reserved by Maria De Leon

Things that Send a Chill Down my Spine: By Maria De Leon

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” If  you are reading this than you are blissfully unaware of what is behind you (or rather in front of us).” ~unknown

As we approach the end of October and many are beginning to get excited about Halloween, I begin to ponder on all the scary and crazy things we have gone through this year. This year seems like nature brought about the biggest scares with hurricane after hurricane and wild fire after wild fire leaving many homeless, destitute and without medical care to boot.

Many of us may still be reeling from the personal losses we might have endured this year while having to contemplate our mental and physical well being with great trepidation as we go into a new medicare enrollment period (since most of us with chronic illnesses are under this program).

I fear for the future of  the community of chronically ill and disabled individuals (e.g. Parkinson’s patients) as it seems no one is really looking out for them. All year there have been many attempts to alter the present health care laws. Although,  supposedly these were meant to improve current policies in reality all proposal have fallen short of  their intended goal -helping the sick and poor. Fortunately, most have been rejected but no real progress has been made in this arena.

Now, the new passing of bill failing to revive subsides for poor may bring a whole host of new issues especially for states with a large number of indigent and people on medicaid as is the state of Texas. some experts are now claiming that “President Trump’s decision to cancel key ObamaCare payments could be backfiring” by bringing into effect the laws of supply and demand forcing patients to shop around for better deals.

However, this reasoning is fret with dangers since we are talking about an elderly, sick, and in many cases poorly educated population who have neither the time, the skills, or the savvy-ness to know that there may be better plans out there. While for those of us like me who are able to and know about these options it is still a huge ordeal that requires countless man hours to determine what is the best plan considering all the medical issues and number of medications I take.  Plus, when you change plans, there is always a risk that a doctor whom you are well established with will not take that particular insurance. As it has happened to me and many others when changing insurance due to enormous premiums i am now forced to see my specialists out of network costing me even higher out of pocket expenses. One does not always have this liberty one due to increase expense for seeing out of network specialist and two  there may not even be a specialist in your area covered by your plan. This is one of the biggest reasons teleneurology for Parkinson’s needs to be allowed to be covered across state lines.

Also, even if a person with much labor could get a better deal in insurance premiums, there is no guarantee that the medications one needs to function will be covered. As we get sicker and more disabled we are less able to cope with all these changes and regulations making it harder for chronically ill to stay insured and receive adequate benefits. My insurance has already informed me that my premiums were tripling for next year- which means need to find new insurance but it is with heavy heart I have to undertake this because i finally got insurance after 8 months to cover the medications that I need. so i am not looking forward to having to battle this issue again. because it is easier to stay with current plan when you have so many things going on like trying to survive a chronic illness, i see these new changes in the law as causing bigger problems to the infirm.

Getting rid of medicare part D would greatly improve things in my opinion. Ever since this was introduced i saw a huge increase in my patients having exacerbation of their once stable illnesses as well as increased hospitalization due to the fact that many like me who take a lot of expensive medications reach the gap within first 2-3 months of the year leaving them with a choice between medicine or paying other essential bills. in the past prior to this law, most doctors including myself were able to help out patients by providing samples or finding resources to meet the needs. But, once part D came into effect these options were taken away.

So in effect the uncertainty of my illness for upcoming year along with all the healthcare changes coming our way are more frightening and terrifying than most things I can imagine especially since like many others I am part of the  sandwich generation. I not only have to worry about my own decaying health but have to take care of several infirm elderly parents and raise a child.

Thus, I urge everyone to contact their state representatives regarding need for teleneurology and improvement in access to health care and ability to maintain our own physicians and right to have the medicines prescribed by our healthcare professionals.

In conclusion, this Halloween let’s ‘use our imagination not to scare ourselves to death’ but to inspire us to pursue those things which are worthy of our time and resources for a better, healthier life with PD (and any other chronic illness).

Happy Halloween everyone!  Eat drink and be spooktacular!hall

Sources:

Sullivan, Peter. (Oct 27 2017) Trump Obamacare may bolster law

Judge rejects bid by 18 US states to revive ACA subsidies Reuters health Info Oct 25 2017

 

@copy right 2017

all rightsd reserved by Maria De Leon

 

 

“How Do You Solve a Problem like Maria?”: by Maria De Leon

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When life gives you lemons -you make lemon meringue pie…

For the last few weeks, i have been so excited about going to South Dakota to a Parkinson’s retreat in an abbey and all i could think was ..running up a hill singing “the hills are alive with the sound of music…” from one of my all time favorite musicals and beloved character because it not only happens to bear my name sake but is the first movie i recall seeing with my grandfather as a child in Mexico.

But as usual, when I get too excited about something as of late PD always rears its ugly head. so perhaps i should have written how do you solve a problem like PD?

That’s the million dollar question, although no solution as of yet we have to still find a way to make margaritas, pies, lemonade and whatever else you can think with the citric juices of lemons that sometimes having a chronic illness leaves us with.

Although, the theory of PD being immunological is not proven, I am a firm believer that at least in those of us with LLRK2 phenotype do seem to have a higher propensity for getting immune based illnesses like UC ( Ulcerative Colitis),  and other immune mediated disease like thyroiditis and diabetes. ever since i been diagnosed with PD my immune system has been more chaotic than ever leaving me more and more prone to any and all viruses and bacteria circulating about which for the average healthy person would not even have a minimal reaction. But for me a common viral upper respiratory infection it leads to a whole cascade of problems and a new one this time around.

As all of you who live with PD and other chronic illnesses very well know it takes twice as long to recoup from any minor illness than normal people do. One way i have learned to cope with this is make sure start treatments ASAP, drink lots of fluids, rest and take extra vitamins, and levodopa to decrease length of illness which typically works fine. this was the strategy since i got sinusitis infection over 10 days ago knowing full well that i have a huge list of commitments and especially looking forward to traveling to see old friends, meet new ones and run up the hill although with the cough and bronchitis I developed i figured i would be more like a slow crawl. nevertheless, I was optimistic surely I would be all back to normal in more than 10 days time.

Well, little did I know that Maria an unsolvable problem by itself combined with my old pal Parkinson’s would come in to wreak as much havoc on me as it did in Puerto Rico. I am always amazed how many new symptoms of PD I am discovering as a patient that I never knew as a doctor specializing in this disease. I have treated many a MS, stroke, and spinal cord injury patient with dysautonomia- in other words dysregulation of the autonomic system. This is where a mild or seemingly innocuous event like a viral infection can trigger a whole host of responses from the body worst than infection itself. typical triggers are dehydration and bladder infection. Even in the multi system atrophy (MSA) patients who commonly have this problem, have I ever seen such an exaggerated response.

In Parkinson’s patients the dysautonomia is usually confined to abnormal functioning of bladder. But, never in my years of treating patients have I seen a full blown decompensation of organs which are regulated by autonomic system..means all the organs which secrete substances like the pancreas, heart, bladder, sweat glands, gut and so on. So i am experiencing horrific chest pain , breathing problems with increasing mucous production, severe palpitations, increased heart rate, nausea, increased tremors, and profuse sweating. Even though I am freezing to death feeling like I am inside an ice box. so in the middle of 80 degree weather, I am looking ridiculous, as per my daughter, because  on top of all my layers of clothing I have a coat and walking around with a faux fur blanket trying to keep warm. Plus, I am trying to keep my sugar from dropping by forcing down food.

When patients with this problem have an infection they have an exaggerated response of dealing with infection as was my case- having higher fever, increased exaggerated sweating, chills and rigors. But, interestingly and another one for the books is that my cold symptoms were much more unilateral making me think i had a thalamic stroke (organ in brain involved in temperature regulation) or a lesion in my spinal cord. but, after consulting with 2 other movement disorder specialist we came to conclusion it was most likely the PD; although never seen as affecting one side more than another- hence unsolvable Maria problem.

But, as I am always an optimist, I feel that my misadventures have once again left me with a new lesson to impart to all my fellow Parkinson’s patients. should you ever have this problem – don’t panic. But, if having symptoms need to talk to doctor ASAP because it can potentially be life threatening. We treat symptomatically.  This means lots of hydration, high salt diet, head elevation, sometimes requires iv fluid replacement and medications to increase blood pressure like midrodine, flurocortisone.

And of course treat underlying cause which triggered problem in my case upper respiratory infection.

On the positive side, I am hoping that all the sweating has shrunk my waist line a bit or at least partially counteract the effects of the steroids given to me – which thankfully helped to increase my blood pressure and my sugars to prevent me from crashing.

So instead of running a a hill– i will stay home and do conferencing via skype discussing how to solve a problem like me and pd.

 

Source:

To learn more about dysautonomia go to…

  1. ninds.nih.gov/disorders/dysautonomia/dysautonomia.htm

 

 

 

Do it with passion or not at all: By Maria De Leon

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“It takes a glacier about a year to move, but eventually it carves out canyons.” Perseve(red)

Since the time of Ancient Greece, a life full of passion was one worth living well. Whether or not the ancients had eulogies at funeral is unclear. However a man’s life might still have been measured on what drove him- the amount of  passion or ‘pathos’ he possessed – that which made him go all in. In other words, what is it that makes us fearless in pursuit of what sets our souls on fire? For me, I have 3 passions God, my family and Neurology in particular working with those who live with Parkinson’s in their lives.yo y mi libro diva

In the last few weeks my love for PD has been fueled as I have traveled north to drop off my niece at college.  I got the opportunity to meet various Parkinson’s advocates like Chris and John from Philadelphia who graciously opened their hearts and their homes to me and my family for an enchanting evening of conversation and entertainment. I also had the great pleasure of meeting two wonderful people Kate and Chris part of a great social media medical community of Health Union who not only have shared their passions with me but granted me an opportunity to continue my passion for writing about the things I love while helping the PD and migraine communities. Plus, I am super excited that my Spanish book on “living beyond PD” (Viviendo más allá del Parkinson) will finally be making its debut in the next 4 weeks. Plus, I am always completely at awe and stoked to be able to come to you in this humble way to share my life with you so as to provide a ray of hope and sunshine because no matter how strong we are we all need to be loved and cared for. We need each other because we all have days when all the digging and struggling only makes us more muddled.me chris and stephanie

However, as I have fallen many times flat on my face and risen again to fight another day, I have confirmed once again that having and living with a chronic illness like PD does not have to decrease our interest for living, succeeding and dreaming. Life is what you make of it -weather we live with an illness or not have Parkinson’s or something else we all have struggles, hardships, and traumatic events which can propel us forward to a better tomorrow or crush us if we let it.  I have been given the opportunity to travel to South Dakota to do a weekend retreat at an abbey for those who care for someone with Parkinson’s as well as for PD patients which will include exercise classes, and educational classes to teach other the skills of living well beyond their own limitations brought on by the disease.me john chris

Please don’t let the shock and pain you are experiencing g today make you numb for the rest of your life. Even if you got nothing left, find your purpose maybe start by reaching out to your neighbor or friend who has less than you. The storm brings forth character, integrity, honesty especially when comfort is removed. The first step in sorting g over or getting back up is up to us. So, don’t wait for others to rescue you first, rather make your first step in improving your situation and others will join in to help. Remember none of us can do it all alone or know it all. But everyone knows something, can contribute something to our lives. So go ahead and start small. Who care how it looks? Ask for help when needed. When I first began this journey I could not even walk had to use a walker then a cane. I needed help to do most activities including dressing myself. This is not a race or a competition but it is about being empowered and finding yourself  as you push through the darkness into the light as you find your purpose, your own passion that will make you defy all the odds and come out victorious. But the driving force can’t be just anything – it has got to be BIG enough, strong enough and powerful enough to propel you forward.

What drives you today to keep moving? Do you have the passion to go all in and fight as if your life depended on it because it does?

sources:

Be Inspi(red): words of Hope and courage 2007 by Hallmark Licensing Inc.

@Copy right  2017; all rights reserved Maria De Leon