Thanksgiving in the midst of adversity: By Maria De Leon

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“In all things give thanks…” 1 Thessalonians 5:18

As the years go by, I find that it is the small things in life that truly matter. It is these things that make a life worth living and worth remembering – so this thanksgiving season I like to express my gratitude for the small things that punctuate my life in the midst of my ongoing ever complex not one but two chronic illnesses. Having now been diagnosed with lupus as well!

This year has been a year of many important milestones- celebrating 20th anniversary, turning 50, getting the opportunity to be a ‘starlet’ for a week, reuniting with long lost friends, honored to give first all women with Parkinson’s conference in Indiana, had the honor to be part of an avant-garde weekend retreat for Parkinson’s patients and their caregivers in South Dakota with nearly a 100 in attendance, being part of a pilot program to help young women to grow spiritually, learn life skills, and be empowered in the midst of their circumstances in order to thrive as successful adults turning into tomorrow’s fearless mothers, wives, friends, professionals and leaders. Finally, I also had the privilege of having my ‘parkinsonsdiva’ blog be recognized twice as one of the BEST! In the PD community (This of course could not happen without all you wonderful people (women) who take time to read it and make it one of the best! thank you!)

I was touched by one of the most beautiful common experiences which took an unexpected twist for a memorable and meaningful events of my life just when I needed hope and encouragement the most.

We all know that most of our lives are punctuated by peaks and valleys and although we wish we could go from peak to peak there is still something beautiful and comforting in the valleys. The valleys in biblical times is where one was most certain to find God and healing could commence from inside out. But aside from finding salvation in the least likely of places, we also have signs that continue to inspire us and gives us hope in our daily walks. When my dad was terminally ill, I witnessed the most magnificent double rainbow as I was driving home full of tears on my way back from the hospital and upon seeing such spectacular view I felt at peace and knew everything was going to be okay.

Four years later, about the same time my dad started his downward decline I began to have serious medical issues which have been taking me away to some extent from you and the things I love. Yet, on my way back from a very long and arduous trip to the hospital and a slew of specialist as I dosed off while my mom drove, I saw the edge of a rainbow. I wondered out loud if anyone had ever seen the end of a rainbow- after all they are said to be full circles which I had privilege of seeing once before in the Las Vegas. Perhaps there instead of a pot of gold I could find a greater treasure like health once more.

Suddenly, I began to see one rainbow after another all sizes and brilliance and then we came to the end of a rainbow it merged right into the spot where our car was standing at the light but if you looked up it seem to sprout out of us from inside the car. I sat up and marveled at the phenomenon but in the next 40 minutes of our journey this occurrence took place at least 4 more times.-lifting my sadness, and strengthening my weakening resolve to keep on fighting for the people and the things I love most. Just to let me know that these signs from heaven were not mere coincidences that he still was in control of my live and my well-being and that my faith in God had been duly noted for once we arrived to a sunny home leaving rain behind- when I stepped out once more as the sun was beginning to set amidst a purplish sky there it was once more a splendid rainbow across the sky.
You may say, how can I give thanks living with PD? Or how can I find joy in my present circumstances? Believe me, I understand your trepidation. Is not easy to feat to face our fears but you can do it because you are not alone. We (especially me) are here to share the rainbows with you to help find your inner peace and conquer the valleys of loneliness, illness, frustration, and hopelessness. As I have learned to conquer my fears of living life with a progressive debilitating illness and face head on an uncertain future by believing in God you too can find harmony and give thanks in the midst of adversity.

Although, there have been many losses I have also experienced many great things this year when is all added up the pluses will definitely outweigh the negatives. I continue to be grateful for my health however failing it maybe at times, my family, friends and the whole Parkinson’s community who has invited me into their homes.
Thank you,
Parkinson’s Diva
Happy Thanksgiving!!!!

Copyright2018
All rights reserved by Maria De Leon MD

Rhapsody of a Diva: By Maria De Leon

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“We are the champions of the world. We will keep on fighting till the end…” (Queen)

Over the last few weeks, as I have tried to make sense of my life in light of my seemingly endless medical problem list; I have had plenty of time for introspection as I lingered around the house in my pajamas watching movies when not in pain, nauseated, or having fever and chills. My favorite movie genre as of late are those based on real life. In my moments of feeling better and not having to see a doctor or get yet another test done to figure the conundrum that is my illness, it occurred to me that in life the most beautiful things usually come out of the darkest and most painful times our life’s.

Throughout history we are reminded time and time again that the things that inspire and endure the test of time are those that arise from the ashes of near annihilation.

I love the story of the thorn bird legend, although believed to be purely mythical, is the perfect embodiment of a notion that greatness can only be achieved by walking through fire or standing in the lion’s den. The Celtic legend, upon which the story is supposedly based on, says that there lives a “bird that sings more sweetly than any other on earth as he dies that even God in heaven stands still and smiles.” While dying he rises above the agony of his pain caused by being impaled on the sharpest thorn. Such examples of greatness can only emerge out of the fiery ashes. The outcome of such struggles of the soul, if we are courageous enough to stand and fight, typically bring forth redemption, self-love, understanding, and compassion which permeates throughout in the same fashion in which the light casts its warmth upon a dark cold room when the window is open to let sunshine in. A small light can illuminate even the darkest of rooms but a dark room can never overpower even the faintest of lights. So keep on fighting even if you feel like you don’t have the stamina to go on….
The greatest feats and gifts to mankind have been borne out of despair, hopelessness, uncertainty and loneliness.

Beethoven composed his 9th symphony “Ode to Joy” when he was totally deaf. Van Gogh painted “Starry Night” in the midst of a mental asylum cell, the apostle Paul wrote his most powerful letters while imprisoned and our salvation was bought at the ultimate price of pain and agony on a rugged cross.
What will my legacy be to this world and my children be? I wonder. Will my life be an example of courage and triumph? What will yours be? Will you wallow in your pain and stay a victim? or will you like many before us have the courage to conquer and not be defeated by our present circumstances?
As for me: through the grace of God I have discovered courage in the midst of my never-ending battles with physical illness along with a renewed sense of purpose and hope.
So I sing to myself… “What a wonderful world!”
Will you sing too with a new sense of purpose?

I love to hear your stories …would you share with me and others so we can all gain courage and strength by knowing we have been able to overcome thus far.

Many Blessings to all on this beautiful day.
Love,
Parkinsonsdiva

@copyright2018
All rights reserved by Maria de Leon

How to Avoid Relational Shipwrecks: By Maria De Leon

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Before Parkinson’s (any chronic illness, we all “lived like water flowing down a hill..going in a single direction until we splashed” against a rock which has forced us to find a new path.

A Relationship by definition is the way two or more people are connected but more importantly how they behave towards one another. As long we live in this world, we will always have relationships some of which are closer and more intimate than others. These latter ones are the ones that become more deeply impacted and can be totally uprooted by our behavior, the choices we make and the things that impact our lives.
We know that no two people are ever alike and the fashion in which we deal with stressful situations is no exception.

This is the time when boundaries will be pushed to the limit.

So it should not be a big surprise that when major life stresses occur in our life’s any and all relationships will be put to the test. The hardest hit are always the ones closest to us like our immediate family and close friends.
I too have lost relationships of decades because the person I thought would understand my shortcomings would understand. Although, the losses hurt and the relationship mourned I had to come to terms that my health was more important.

How do we keep our most valued relationships from becoming part of an UN-salvageable shipwreck?

Setting appropriate boundaries.
We can’t expect to have good relationships or understanding of our needs; much less be able to tell our friends and family what we like to get from them to help us continue being the friend, partner, lover, sister, and mother. Although, these will have to undergo some type of modifications to allow for life’s changes in both parties.
Discuss gently with the people you love, the specific issues you have and then try to find ways to get around these issues. For instance, I tell my friends and family that in order to protect my limited energy/time that may be needed for a higher priority, I reserve the right to cancel a commitment especially if I am not well.

Sometimes however despite our best efforts casualties will occur and we must learn to let go.

When we set boundaries saying what we will and will not accept in our lives it forces the other person to evaluate their own boundaries.
How you handle these strains depends on the intimacy of relationship and how valuable that friendship etc. Some relationships can’t be dissolve such as familial ties but can become estranged with lack of communication.

I am sure all of us have experienced strained relationships during our lives particularly after receiving a Parkinson’s diagnosis. At times is hard even for us to accept our own illness much less for others who are mere spectators to fully understand our condition as outsiders.

For instance, my close friends know that my life changes day to day and so in making social plans we have learned to give each other leeway in changing plans last minutes as long as we both get the same opportunity. Equally we are all open to spontaneous planning to gather. In my case, people that have trouble accommodating to this my new life and insist on making plans way in advance and or in getting upset if things change last minute have been for the most part excluded from my social circle. Similarly because of my ups and downs and loss of voice along with all my other demands, I have adopted communicating with my special friends and family members for the most part via text. This way we are constantly in communication. However, there have been those that insisted and got upset if I was not able to speak directly with them at the time they need me without understanding my own issues and did not want to compromise as to how and when we spoke. These types of demanding behavior even from long term friendships have resulted in breakage of a friendship. But like a bad hair do you must simply accept it and know that you will get another chance to try something new and perhaps even better.

Take away

Because we don’t live in a vacuum all of our actions have consequences. You must speak up and let the person know how you feel and is up to that person to respond positively or ignore your circumstances. If that person makes no effort in meeting you half way perhaps is time to rethink that relationship.
Develop healthy boundaries say YES to good things and NO to bad things! Speak your mind gently without feeling guilty but remember that those around you have the SAME right to decide what they deem BEST for them!

@copyright2018
all rights reserved by Maria De Leon MD

PD & the ‘Kamehameha Effect’: By Maria De Leon

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Have you ever heard your loved ones complain or say that when you are up and about in public you seem different? They may describe you as lively, happy, and energized but moving better even. However, they gasp, as my husband often does, asking why can’t we simply have that kind of motivation when we are at home rather than just sit around like bumps on a log?

Not long ago when my family and I traveled to Hawaii for vacation my husband finally put a term to this positive effect of well-being that ensues when confronted with something utterly delightful to us. The ‘Kamehameha effect’ as my husband lovingly has coined it, is the end result of a natural boost of dopamine in our brain’s when confronted with pleasurable, enjoyable things. After hours of touring the island, there I was barely able to walk, shuffling, feeling stiff all over particularly in my lower back which was beginning to hurt down to my feet. I was choking on my own saliva and was beginning to lose my voice. When suddenly we came upon the current Supreme Court of Hawaii – also known as Aliiolani Hale building which has in its courtyard a statue of King Kamehameha I which is facing Lolani Palace. At the site of this grand structure I became so ecstatic since it happens to be the headquarters of Commander Garret and his Hawaii 5-0 unit. Seems like within minutes, I was no longer stiff, shuffling or choking. Husband was astonished at the effect calling it the ‘Kamehameha effect’ and still teases me about this every chance he gets. IMG_1866

He insists that this effect is purely is psychological and wishes I could summon it at will. However, although it has a psychological component is not that easy. It is instead a chemical reaction that takes place in our brains once ignited by exterior forces. The ‘Kamehameha effect’ is one that can be seen even in groups of Parkinson’s people at the same time if united by same outside force as was the case in New Orleans when the Saints won the Super bowl in 2010. According to Dr. Georgia Lea, a neurologists and assistant Neurology professor at the Oschsner Institute in NOLA, that during the super bowl championship all her PD patients who were fans of the SAINT’s suddenly were cured for hours to days!

This is the ‘Kamehameha effect’ at its core – ignite our own happy endogenous neurochemicals to bring forth dramatic improvement in our PD symptoms.
Although, this effect is not a switch which can be turned ‘on’ and ‘off’ at will, there are things we can do to promote the repeated occurrence of this phenomena by doing things which brings us joy, passion, love, gratitude and satisfaction. As one of my favorite literary authors Gabriel Garcia Marquez would say; “there is no medicine to cure what happiness cannot.”
Go ahead find your passion and unleash the ‘Kamehameha effect

@copyright2018
all rights reserved by Maria De Leon

My Life as a Woman with PD parallels Being a Woman in Medicine By Maria De León

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“It is not easy to be a pioneer- but oh, it is fascinating! I would not trade one moment, even the worst moment, for all the riches in the world.” Elizabeth Blackwell

Living with Parkinson’s as a women is a lot like being a woman in the field of medicine rare. (I must say I well am versed in the challenges of both) Although both seem to be increasing these days. Perhaps because we are beginning to take notice of the remarkable attributes, talents, and passion women possess. But, most importantly because we are now learning to stand up for ourselves for what we believe and fight for our own well-being and happiness. We are becoming better self-advocates in both arenas.

As a Hispanic woman interested in medicine, I was always teased and discouraged about pursuing a career in a “men’s” field. When I first developed symptoms of PD, I again was ridiculed for my outlandish claims of having Parkinson’s as a young woman; after all this was supposed to be an illness of predominantly older white men.

Apparently, I have never been one to conform to norms. I have always fancied myself somewhat of a pioneer for no matter where I am I always seem to be the exception to the rule (in who I am, what I think, and what I do- always sticking out as a sore thumb). Nothing seems to cause so much shock in people as me being a Hispanic female neurologist. Not unlike being a young woman with PD. Both usually cause some type of disbelief followed by wonder and amazement. How did I do it? How do I continue to do it? How do I seem to “have it all?”

Breakthroughs:
It is hard for me to imagine a time when women simply were discouraged from becoming doctors when nearly half of all medical students at present are women. It is equally difficult for me to imagine a time when I did not know a number of young women with Parkinson’s. Despite these facts we women still continue to face challenges and have barriers to break.
When I first embarked in this Parkinson’s journey as a patient more than a decade ago, I set out to find answers for the differences in gender and published my first book on the subject: “Parkinson’s Diva: A Woman’s Guide to Parkinson’s disease.” For it seemed to me that many neurological illnesses like strokes, migraines and epilepsy had unique characteristics tied to specific gender. Women with these illnesses thus required special treatment tailored to their own needs. Similarly women with PD independent of age have different characteristics which separates them from their male counterparts. Many of the challenges women face with any disease unfortunately are directly or indirectly linked to socially imposed norms. For young women with PD, the challenges seem a bit more complex just like starting out in the field of medicine. We need to find our place while pursuing our passions, goals, and attempting to strike a so called ‘balance’ between work and family or on this case home and living with PD. If we don’t have the right support we can easily get swallowed up by our circumstances and barriers.

Although, I feel I have achieved many of my dreams and faced many stumbling blocks both as a professional as well as a patient – I have also been privy to many breakthroughs. I am glad to see so many embracing these differences and attempting to learn from these to enhance the lives of us who live with this complex disease.

Legacy of those that went before us: (especial thanks to Dr. M Schiess and to Dr. A. Nunez)
We must draw on the legacy of women all around to continue to make way in both arenas. These great women have been our mentors who have paved the way by showing me and others how to be a physician, a teacher a mentor, a mother, wife and now a patient. Because of their unwavering devotion and commitment to better lives of other women. They stood by me and supported me in my decisions to pursue my area of interest and nurtured my passion. They gave me the skills to look beyond what is before us to what might be. Not knowing that someday, I would use these skills to empower me and other women to become better patient advocates.

What we share in common:
We as a gender independently of our back grounds are united by the fact that multitasking is our way of life. One of the biggest impacts for me as a physician and woman has been the difficulty in multi-tasking that I have experienced since developing PD. It is this inability to carry more than one complex task at a time that has made me unable to continue to practice my beloved profession. But, it has also made me realized that this disruption in task performance can be extremely detrimental as a mother, wife, and daughter. Even when we delegate some of these tasks (like cleaning, cooking, shopping) to others because of our disease we are still ultimately responsible for the “emotional” work that goes into it. We still have to plan, organize, supervise the household, our work as well as our kid’s schedules and activities; while we make sure we assist their school meetings, performances, and keep up with their social and emotional growth. After all it is up to us how our children turn up as adults. We want strong confident, well-grounded sympathetic and caring adults (Not an easy feat even when we are healthy).
As a female physician, I knew that it was up to me to find that “balance” between home and career. Over the years, I have learned than that it is impossible to have it all. The balance in life comes not in being able to do everything and have everything but spending your time doing what matters most with those that are most important in your life. This is the true balance. This is also where being a woman doctor and a woman with PD parallel one other. In order to be successful at either, we must begin by setting priorities. We must learn to make decisions without allowing social norms to interfere with or dictate what the rules of our own life and home should be. What works for me may not necessarily work for someone else. I am lucky to have a husband who is a good provider but is also not afraid to help out with household chores when the need arises. He does not make many demands on me – however there are task which he simply won’t address, most of the time because as a man he does not think are important or necessary. He will chauffeur my daughter but rarely knows her schedule.
For all female physicians just like for all women with Parkinson’s having a strong support system is crucial to being able to weather any storm and share the daily burdens of trying to “have it all” or do it all. I dole out my energy to the most important things in my life. For instance being present in my daughter’s life is of the utmost importance. Everything else comes second. When deciding is like doing patient triage, I think about what needs my most immediate attention at the moment and what can wait. Practice doing this and I guarantee that some stresses will begin to melt away from your life.

Challenges ahead:
Although we still have much to learn about gender differences in the area of PD. This is an exciting time. We are slowly beginning to see a shifts in the way we approach women’s health issues and gender differences in relation to PD. Yet, I like to see the minority gap close and the time to actual diagnosis of women be dramatically reduced.
But know that the strength lies within each one of you. Surely you can remember a time when you thought it was impossible to achieve something or get through a circumstance that seemed insurmountable but like me once I achieved my goal of becoming a doctor all the pain and struggle was worth the effort. You should hold on to your victories and triumphs to build your future upon. You were strong once you will be strong again! Use that knowledge to get through the toughest days with PD or any other challenge in your life and don’t ever give up. What has gotten me through all these years first through medical school and now through life with a chronic illness is first Faith followed by a bunch of perseverance and determination. Follow your passion whatever that may be …for me having a purpose to wake up every morning as made all the difference first in becoming a doctor now in being the best mother I can be along with building a legacy upon which all women especially those with PD can have a more fruitful and fuller lives. We all know it is not easy breaking stereotypes, forging new paths, and bringing awareness to issues previously considered taboo.
Learn to roll with the punches and learn from them…there is always a new dream even when the old one seems to have faded away.

Copy right2018
All rights reserved by Maria de León

What I have been surprised to discover while living with Parkinson’s disease? By Maria De Leon

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The other day, I dreamt of God above – He smiled and said: ‘don’t worry, your faith is strong; you know you have been here before. Just gaze upon my face and everything shall be alright.’ I smiled at HIM and softly uttered a broken Hallelujah! – Alleluia. Alleluia
Although, my faith IS strong and has grown immensely over the last decade somedays it seems that the dark clouds in life want to hang on just a bit longer than usual putting all our beliefs to the test.
This seems to be the case for me over the last month.

So, I had to remind myself of how far I have come and all the challenges I have endured in the past which have only served to make me stronger. I like to think of the peaks and valleys we have gone through in our life as a mechanism to help us get through things faster and with greater ease. (Just like the brain network is connected via myelinated sheaths which help disseminate information quicker from one area to another- if we would interrupt the myelin, information would surely get delayed and we might even find ourselves stuck. Such are our past experiences, the more we have overcome the greater ease we have of moving forward…)

I have learned that God is strongest when I am weak.
I have learned that I am much stronger than I once thought and much more resilient than I ever gave myself credit for. I thought I would never survive the first diagnosis of a chronic illness, nor giving up my practice. Yet, here I stand …
Despite years of trying to hide my physical flaws, I have learned to embrace those blemishes, scars, and all. I have learned to focus on my most attractive features which are my smile and my “Spanish” eyes.
I have learned to love myself strengths and weaknesses. After all beauty begins when we first decide to love ourselves. At times, we must learn to turn our weaknesses into strengths. For instance, once upon a time I was extremely shy and afraid of speaking in public (hard to believe I know). I would become paralyzed with fear of being judged. These days however, I embrace it fully. Public speaking has been a source of great joy in my life as I seem to have become the voice for women with Parkinson’s disease and other chronic illnesses.
I have learned that we all have the inner fortitude to do what you could not do before- I am learning to wait in silence and developing beaucoup patience!
I have learned that you will feel what you did not before- sympathy, empathy, kindness, love, gratitude…
I have become knowledgeable on things I never knew.
I have also learned that inner beauty never fades.
I love being a mom.
I am creative after all.
I am a trendsetter and fashionista at heart.
I am excited about living life to the fullest.
I cherish my time with my girlfriends.
Beauty and inspiration come from places we least expect.
All women are strong beautiful and able and we were fiercely made for a time such as this.
So go ahead find your passion and bring out your inner beauty by discovering new horizons and gifts within yourself. Despite what you may be facing today- you are not alone, you are loved, and this too shall pass! You just have to hold on long enough and keep the faith.

@copyright2018
all rights reserved by Maria De Leon

Parkinson’s disease and dealing with other medical problems: By Maria De Leon

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“When the winds of change blow, some people build walls others build windmills”- Chinese Proverb

Lately, I have been a bit distant from my social media sites and blogs and I must ask for forgiveness. After a month of joyful celebration on the occasion of my birthday, I have discovered that even the good times can end up in flames and the best things can go up –up-up into the stratosphere in a split of a second. At that time, we stop and try as best we can to reach and hold on to the good times and fond memories before they are completely out of our reach till the wind changes once again bringing us back the things we love.
So, at present the winds of my sail have slightly shifted into some rough waters and I am struggling to hold onto the elusive butterfly of good health ( as much as one can have good health in the midst of a chronic illness like PD) waiting for a favorable wind once more.
Funny thing is that as we all live with a chronic illness, we tend to worry about things that will most likely never happen; yet the things we never see coming can take us for a loop and blindside us especially when they come unexpectedly on a Tuesday afternoon as most unexpected things do.
After a month of pancreatitis followed by a wonderful month of birthday celebrations, reuniting with old friends and working on the things I love writing, speaking, sharing stories over coffee with other fellow Parkinson’s friends, I got a most unexpected call. You have a “mass” in an unexpected place- my liver.
As my life came to a scratching halt, I have come to realize a few things.
First, how lucky I am to have a wonderful husband, daughter, family as well as wonderful friends such as you guys.
Second, despite the fact that in this country we are experiencing a terrible health crisis, we are still very lucky to be able to have choices regarding what doctors to see, multiple treatment options even for those of us with low socioeconomic means due to many charitable organizations which help many individuals and families pay for costly treatments. Recently while at the medical center in Houston, I happened to run into a patient who told me she had traveled alone from Australia after selling a great deal of possessions just to be able to make the trip to this country. She said she came here because ‘the US has the best doctors and medicines in the world!’ She was visibly desperate to find answers and new forms of treatments for her cancer. She told me that in her native country although medicine is socialized and free for all, the waits are long and they don’t have many choices …it is first come first serve and one treatment type for all. In her case for her type of cancer. I felt so sorry for her and wished that I could help somehow. After all we know, prognosis and treatment plans really need to be individualized because not a single one among us is the same as the other. Even when we have the same disease or cancer our responses to treatment are entirely unique partly due to our genetics, our sex, as well as our cultural imprinting and belief system.
I referred her to several programs which typically help people with cancer not knowing if they could help her since she was not from this country. All the while hoping and praying they could offer her the assistance she needed to help her chances of recovery and fight her cancer with the best treatment options available.
Little that I know that a few months later I would find myself in a similar situation trying to find the best doctors and treatment options for my own disease. Unlike her, I do have insurance in this country but if it turns out to be a malignancy I will also need some form of assistance from some charitable organization since according to my healthcare provider I am already in the catastrophic range for this year. I thought I was doing great!
Thus my worries at this time are concentrated only on finding the best team of physicians to help me get back to doing what I love; spending time with family and taking care of people with PD. Thank God for the fact that although out healthcare system is in desperate need for an overhaul, we have many entrepreneurs who are willing to help fill in some of the gaps. Nevertheless, we still need our government to step up their efforts so that we don’t end up in a country such as Mexico where medicine like the rest of the country is ruled by the have’s and have –nots creating a sense of laissez-faire attitude in most of the population- why seek care if won’t be able to afford treatment?
Third, dealing with my doctors over the last few weeks, I have once again confirmed the need for self-advocacy. This seems particularly true in this day and age of high physician burn -out and demands within the practice of medicine. This undue stress is imposed especially on those who treat chronically ill patients. That is because the patients with the most medical problems like myself eventually become Medicare recipients. As with any government agency there are always more regulations, restrictions, and demands on the physician. These demands have in turn left physicians stretched so thin that more things are apt to fall through the cracks then previously over the last 2 decades. Abnormal tests can be over looked easily at times…
Hence, when dealing with chronic illnesses have a voice that can advocate on your behalf if you are unable to. It takes time and effort particularly if you are already feeling bad to keep up with doctors’ appointments, insurance bill’s, tests, medications, and so on. Keep a diary, ask specific questions, keep problem issues to no more than 3, make more frequent appointments (don’t settle for I will see you in 6 months if you have ongoing problems), when getting tests done ask specifically what this test will show or help with and during follow up ask again by name the results of that test (e.g. what did my MRI brain show?). If you know you are waiting on test results make sure you schedule to follow up also if you have gotten a new treatment. Always call if in doubt or with questions. Remember to practice patience, which is the most difficult thing to have in the midst of bad news or new procedures. All things in medicine take time especially the more complicated the procedure, the history of the patient, or the findings – which is always my case. Most likely you will have to wait weeks for an answer even when all things are running smoothly – keep your cool, rest, eat well and follow up until you get the desired answer.
This too shall pass and the wind will once again blow in our favor!
when the wind blows don’t be the one fighting it rather be the one to harness it and find a new direction…

@copyright 2018
All rights reserved by Maria De Leon