PD & the ‘Kamehameha Effect’: By Maria De Leon

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Have you ever heard your loved ones complain or say that when you are up and about in public you seem different? They may describe you as lively, happy, and energized but moving better even. However, they gasp, as my husband often does, asking why can’t we simply have that kind of motivation when we are at home rather than just sit around like bumps on a log?

Not long ago when my family and I traveled to Hawaii for vacation my husband finally put a term to this positive effect of well-being that ensues when confronted with something utterly delightful to us. The ‘Kamehameha effect’ as my husband lovingly has coined it, is the end result of a natural boost of dopamine in our brain’s when confronted with pleasurable, enjoyable things. After hours of touring the island, there I was barely able to walk, shuffling, feeling stiff all over particularly in my lower back which was beginning to hurt down to my feet. I was choking on my own saliva and was beginning to lose my voice. When suddenly we came upon the current Supreme Court of Hawaii – also known as Aliiolani Hale building which has in its courtyard a statue of King Kamehameha I which is facing Lolani Palace. At the site of this grand structure I became so ecstatic since it happens to be the headquarters of Commander Garret and his Hawaii 5-0 unit. Seems like within minutes, I was no longer stiff, shuffling or choking. Husband was astonished at the effect calling it the ‘Kamehameha effect’ and still teases me about this every chance he gets. IMG_1866

He insists that this effect is purely is psychological and wishes I could summon it at will. However, although it has a psychological component is not that easy. It is instead a chemical reaction that takes place in our brains once ignited by exterior forces. The ‘Kamehameha effect’ is one that can be seen even in groups of Parkinson’s people at the same time if united by same outside force as was the case in New Orleans when the Saints won the Super bowl in 2010. According to Dr. Georgia Lea, a neurologists and assistant Neurology professor at the Oschsner Institute in NOLA, that during the super bowl championship all her PD patients who were fans of the SAINT’s suddenly were cured for hours to days!

This is the ‘Kamehameha effect’ at its core – ignite our own happy endogenous neurochemicals to bring forth dramatic improvement in our PD symptoms.
Although, this effect is not a switch which can be turned ‘on’ and ‘off’ at will, there are things we can do to promote the repeated occurrence of this phenomena by doing things which brings us joy, passion, love, gratitude and satisfaction. As one of my favorite literary authors Gabriel Garcia Marquez would say; “there is no medicine to cure what happiness cannot.”
Go ahead find your passion and unleash the ‘Kamehameha effect

@copyright2018
all rights reserved by Maria De Leon

Risk of Melanoma in PD in Women especially those of a Darker Hue. By Maria De León

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“The summer knows….”

In many parts of the world the heat index is beginning to rise making it feel like summer although summer is officially a few weeks away. Summer means freedom, happiness, ocean breeze, long days and sand between my toes. However, it also reminds me of the ways we must take care of ourselves to enjoy life to the fullest. Even though having sunshine is a great thing we must have balance like everything in our lives. Especially for those of us who have PD and are women are at higher risk by simple fact that not only PD increases risk of melanoma but melanoma is the second – most common form of cancer in women ages 15-29. Plus, according to some surveys it is increasing faster in our gender than in men of same age.

My very first experience as an intern of having to comfort someone with cancer diagnosis in their terminal stage was a young Hispanic man who was about to lose fiancée to metastatic melanoma. This was a devastating moment in my life as well since I had to pronounce dead someone who not only was Hispanic but of my same young age.
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Little did I know then that over the next few decades I would be diagnosed with melanoma a few times already? Fortunately, all 3 times have been caught in first stages where resection was all that was required. However, as a doctor I know that having a history of certain cancers like melanoma are always something to consider when new symptoms arise for these cancers re highly malignant and can spread to almost any part of the body particularly the nervous system.
Now that I have PD, the risk of developing melanoma is greater for me and all people with PD. but, especially for those who have family and personal history of the same. Sadly, for those of us who are Hispanic (who by the way have higher risk of PD) have a higher rate of developing melanoma than two decades ago. Apparently, those of us who have darker skin tone need better sunscreens or perhaps need to begin applying sunscreen. There might be a misconception in our culture that not having pale skin somehow protects us from skin cancers but nothing is further from the truth. Melanin does offer some protection but not nearly enough. IMG_0818

I for instance I don’t tan, I simply burn with minimal exposure to UV rays. I discovered this purely by serendipity one summer at the beach. I had applied sunscreen to my shoulders and face primarily, as most Hispanic women tend to do, but never reapplied by that evening I was swollen like a big toad primarily in my face with glistening puffy water filled bags under my eyes and swollen lips almost disfiguring. Never mind the pain, I was glowing like I had received some form of radiation where even my hair was three shades lighter with only a few hours of sun exposure. This is when I remembered how my grandfather always insisted I wear gloves, hat and long sleeves in the sun…why had I not listened this time? Too busy being young and carefree. For weeks later I simply peeled.
Now even though I love the sun and beach I make sure I use the necessary protection. However, many minority women have not taken heed of the dangers of sun exposure. Plus the fact that among Hispanics, blacks and Indian women melanomas tend to occur in inconspicuous places not usually exposed to the sun. As was my case 2 out of three were not in sun exposed regions of my body. I also lost an Indian friend at young age due to metastatic melanoma which had started in her groin area. Thus by time of detection it had already spread.

Subsequently according to the Journal of the American academy of Dermatology nearly half of black women and a third of Hispanics are diagnosed with this disease in late stages compare to less than a third in white women. Thus fatality is higher in these groups. The question remains is there a biological difference in genetics causing greater risk? Perhaps! But the presentation in soles, palms, and nail beds make it harder to detect, diagnose, and treat appropriately for many doctors might not think melanoma since not directly exposed to sun. Here again the question of healthcare disparity comes into play. Are they going longer without diagnosis because of poor access to care or physician bias? Much more research is needed in this area.

The truth is that we all need to remember to use sunscreen to protect our skin from harmful UV rays especially if you are in the minority groups.Perhaps using sunscreens that leave our skins white and pasty might not be an appealing thing rather serve as a deterrent to many since it is aesthetically unpleasing; especially for those of us who have darker skin. Of course the best sunscreen is one that is used regularly!
Fortunately, the cosmetic industry has taken notice of the need for diverse products which can be used by various groups. Besides sunscreens many cosmetics now have an SPF protection.

How to protect yourself and diminish risk of melanoma:

We may not be able to do anything to avoid getting PD or other chronic illnesses but we sure can do something to prevent skin cancer.IMG_0857

• Use Cosmetics with SPF protection
• Frequent skin checkups especially in winter and in the nude – whole body, if no insurance visit aad.org for list of free SPOTme skin cancer screenings in your state.
• Self-inspection especially of inconspicuous areas – ask partner to help
• Wear gloves if driving in sun
• Use SPF protective garments like bathing suits/hats
• Avoid shellac use of nails routinely because this is applying UV light
• Avoid sun tanning (tanning booths) use instead bronzers than can be sprayed or applied. Many cosmetic brand s offer great products
• Don’t forget your eyes? Wear shades with UV protection
• Apply sunscreen vigorously multiple times don’t forget toes, hands and feet. Must have one with zinc oxide, also avobenzone and oxybenzone but these can be greasy. Look at screen stars which can be friendlier to women of darker skin color
1. Apply one ounce of SPF 45or higher (minimum 30) enough to fill shot glass or golf ball size at least 30minutes before going outside or in the water
2. Reapply every 2 hours or immediately after heavy perspiration or swimming

• Use moisturizers like oil of Olay (my favorite) or Neutrogena both which have SPF.
• If you are a woman with dark skin watch out for sore that won’t heal, patches of rough and dry skin (sounds like I have to go to dermatologist asap), watch for dark lines around finger and toe nails, look for spots on hands, feet, lower legs, groin, mouth, lips buttocks and scalp.
• Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate
After being in sun use some aloe Vera sap all over the exposed body this is soothing and healing.

Have a lovely summer! Soak up the sunshine but don’t forget to be good to yourself and your skin…you will be grateful you did.
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Source:
Douglas Deborah. (S.O.S) the Oprah magazine June 2018 9(6):109-113

@copyright 2018
All rights reserved by Maria De Leon

Parkinson’s mom diary: Maria De Leon

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” A mother is she who can take the place of all others but whose place no one else can take.” unknown

To my dear readers – first i want to thank everyone for making this journey more fun.. and for making this site one of your favorites.

As we near the month of May when we celebrate mother’s day both in this country and other countries around the world such as in my native Mexico, I thought i would write about being a mom with PD.

All of us who are moms know how wonderful and equally challenging is to be a mom; just when you think you have gotten the hang of a stage or phase – our children go on and change. Now imagine having a chronic illness like parkinson’s disease where although no objective fluctuations are noticed or documented we know for a FACT that fluctuations in our daily lives are a part of living with a chronic illness. Sometimes we just don’t know how we are going to feel the next minute much less the next day or month. As my daughter reminded me today when we were having a conversation in the car on way to school, “mom, I am glad you are feeling well these days but it wont last, is just a matter of time!” when i gave her a side ways look she replied: “you know is true. that’s what happens with your disease.”

As much as I protest this statement and try to reassure her (or rather) that this time will be different, i know that as long as i have PD i will have ups and downs which will interfere with my ability to perform my motherly duties. (secretly praying these deviations are few and far between).

However, these roller-coaster episodes has made me reevaluate my thinking and recommendations for women who have PD and want to be moms.

Motherhood as I said is a wonderful experience but is not for the faint of heart because each child comes with his/her own challenges and gifts to deal with; so having more or less is not necessarily the answer.

I was lucky I already had my daughter when I got diagnosed. Yet, because I was so young she has had to live with my illness practically her entire life. Plus, as a mom I have had to struggle much more than I would have should I had been a healthy mom in raising her and being a constant in her life. I was blessed to have friends and family to help me care for her especially during those times when the medication made me so ill i could not drive or the disease was so bad I could not stand to be touched much less cuddle her- something that broke my heart and still to this day feel guilty about.

So deciding to have a child once you are diagnosed with PD is not an easy think to decide and should not be taken lightly. Although, as far as me know fertility does not decrease with the disease and health of fetus is not affected by having PD, many of the medications currently used to treat the symptoms of Parkinson’s are contraindicated at least partially for lack of information on the short and long term effects of the fetus. Further, some of these medications also can be passed through the milk making breast feeding difficult after delivery.

Another thing, one must keep in mind is that PD symptoms can worsen during pregnancy. But, assuming that you are able to carry the pregnancy to full term there are many other issues to consider. Remember this is a progressive disease after all. You must consider not only the stage that you are in at the time of conception but be able to look ahead at the  age you will be and the stage you might be at when your children reach certain milestones like going to elementary school, high school etc. you must also consider your support group – is there a reliable one? Does this include a supportive spouse/ partner? In my early stages of disease I would not have been able to care for my toddler had not been for my husband stepping up and being mom and dad something not every father can do or is willing to do.

We all think about the sleepless nights with infants but for me the hardest years are once they become independent. The problems are bigger, more serious, and require much more involvement from a parent in establishing appropriate boundaries and guidelines. No matter the age children need clear boundaries. If you are too sick to reinforce the rules will only create problems for them as adults in the future.

I do more running around now that my daughter is a teenager than i did when she was younger plus on top of my illness i have increased age which makes me have less stamina and less able or willing to multitask as I did 5 years ago.

However, if you do decide to be a mom with PD make sure you know that you are NOT alone! that you have other women like me to guide and support you and know that it will be the greatest adventure in your life as well as the most rewarding. Plus, for me my child has served as the driving force for wanting to keep fighting and moving and never give up. During my darkest hours, I have relied on her love and smile to give me strength to hang on for one more day till the storm passed. In life there are many substitutions for things,  but there will never be a substitution for a mother’s love!

Happy Mother’s Day to all the beautiful women out there..cherish your kids, they truly are a gift from GOD!

@copyright 2018

all rights reserved by Maria De Leon MD

Bridges & Scenic Roads: by Maria De León

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“Nothing comes ahead of its time and nothing ever happens that did not need to happen.” Byron Katie

As I sit here fighting another bout of bronchitis, yet again; I am inclined to feel a bit sorry for myself. But, all I have to do is stop and look at all the road I have covered over the last year to quickly shake this silly notion.

I have never been a very patient person especially when traveling. I like to zoom, zoom. I am a highway kind of girl. I remember the first time my husband and I took a trip toghter as newly weds to visit his family, he thought it would be nice to take the Natchez Trace Parkway. I nearly lost it; it seemed we had travelled for an eternity at a turtles crawl (can’t travel faster than 45mph). Had I been driving, I would have probably gotten several citations or found a way to get off faster than immediately.Image result for beautiful architectural wooden bridges

At the time, I was not interested in the beautiful sights we encountered along the way nor in the fauna present. I simply wanted to arrive at our destination. This was the state of my life at that time-pretty much rush, rush between work, family, commitments, conferences, etc.. I was always looking ahead at the next destination never really enjoying the moment for the most part until Parkinson’s decided to pay me a visit and make its self at home. Suddenly,  the breaks came screeching on putting a stop to all my senseless running around.Image result for beautiful architectural bridges of the world

Over the last decade, I  have had to learn to enjoy those backroads and not be so concerned about the destination. We all know that living with a chronic illness like PD  permeates into all aspects of our lives affecting everyone which comes into close proximity. thus, more than ever we have to learn to find a balance and enjoy each moment as it comes and not be paralyzed or fearful of what might happen next. Living with PD is truly unpredictable day to day and even hour by hour. Friday was another perfect example of this. I woke up feeling great attended a GO Red luncheon for women with my friend. We had a blast but by the  time I got home in the afternoon, I was out of commission screwing up all the evening and weekend plans.

Instead of worrying about reaching some obscure destination, or fretting over the plans that have been ruined (these days I prefer calling it altered rather than ruined). I have come to enjoy those unexpected detours along the way which may lead to unexpected finds like an old wooden bridge or a beautiful waterfall. These sometimes brief other times extended detours through backroads and scenic routes has helped me discover myself, my true friends, my family and many other people who suffer chronic illnesses which I might have not gotten to know otherwise. This weekend I got to enjoy the company of my daughter and husband although from a distance since I did not want to contaminate them.Image result for beautiful architectural bridges of the world

When I find myself feeling restless and impatient like today, I remind myself that those  eternally winding back roads are helping me build a bridge to my ultimate destination. As we know some bridges are short and some are much longer. Image result for beautiful architectural bridges of the world

Those bridges took years to build some even had to be rebuilt.  Meantime, i keep moving forward even if I feel it’s only one step a day. Someday my bridge will be completed and it will be a grand architectural monument just like those magnificent bridges, I love (e.g. Sydney Harbor Bridge, the London Bridge, and the Golden Gate Bridge to name a few).  My life like those grand architectural structures will stand as a testament of a victorious life which conquered adversity and overcame big odds to bring beauty and function to others.

Thanks to my illness, as my favorite poet Frost once penned, I have taken the road less travelled and this has made all the difference…

I hope today wherever you may find yourself, you find the strength and courage to enjoy those unexpected detours in life and beginning anew building those magnificent bridges.

@copyright 2018

all rights reserved by Maria De León

Embrace the Possibilities: by Maria De León

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As we reach the end of another year, one thing is certain the one thing we can count on is change. Seasons change, fashion changes, friends come and go, our goals, our likes dislikes change and our health stands in the balance of a see-saw not knowing when we will go up or come down.

When I was staring my medical career, I knew I was in for a long haul of commitment and focus. I needed to get myself prepared for what laid ahead mentally. So my best friend from childhood and I decided to take a trip to Acapulco. No better way to replenish the soul and mind than by sitting at the edge of the ocean contemplating and listening to the sound of the  waves. After 27 hours, we finally arrived anxious to enjoy the beach, my friend and I ventured out in the evening as the sun was going down and the tides were beginning to pick up. Yet, all we wanted was to bask in the view and maybe get our feet wet a bit. I carefully laid out my beach towel, my clothes, sandals, and other possessions, I was about to sit on my towel when a huge wave crashed upon the shore engulfing my belongings. Our carefully chosen spot had proven to be not far enough from the rising evening  tides. Apparently, this was high tide season. As the waves retrieved, it carried with it all my possessions leaving me mystified.

As I watched all of my things being dragged into the ocean, I took off running after it. It had taken my wallet. However, the waves were not only faster but retrieved deeper into the bay. As we sat there a bit dumbfounded about how quickly it had all happened taking us by surprise and resigning myself that on my first day I had lost all my money.  When a few minutes later another huge wave happened upon the shore bigger than the first one as it crashing briskly upon us and the rocks but as it retrieved I began to notice a resurfacing of my things. Quickly my friend and I sprang to retrieve my wallet first before it could be engulfed again perhaps this time never to be seen an de completely ruining my vacation. Of course, everything was completely soiled. The large beach towel was filed with muddy sand, seashells and a few small crabs. I did not care all my things were back.

This event thought me that sometimes the change of the tides can take us by surprise leaving us discombobulated and dumbfounded, wondering were to go next or what to do.

But, just as surely as the sun rises and sets, if  we just keep breathing staying alive fighting for the things we want and keeping a watchful eye eventually the same tide will come again bringing back that which we thought was gone and lost forever. Better yet giving us a way to move from the shore to new lands and dreams because at some point all of us have to move person past the crest line.

as we start a brand new year with 365 blank pages to fill, remember that although we are not in control of when the tide comes in or how big the crest of the waves are, we are in control of how we allow the tides of life to impact us. In the same trip a couple of days later, my friend and I decided to eat at this mom and pop makeshift restaurant on the same beach while we ate barefooted. I enjoyed the coming and going of the waves past my feet underneath the table where we sat. To this day I savor the thought and wish to return to that place.

So as you find yourself face to face with an unexpected tide which might leave you Topsy curvy rather than panic or give up; wait awhile the tide will eventually change allowing you to move forward an din doing so take inventory and breath in the endless possibilities. Notwithstanding that It is our impossibilities that become our greatest gifts – it certainly has been the case for me having reinvented myself and enjoying my life fully despite living with pd for a decade.

Trust that nothing is ever wasted and in the end if you allow yourself to embrace the changes that the tides brings you will emerge softer, gentler, kinder, more courageous, and stronger than ever.

Happy Holidays!

@copyright 2017

all rights reserved by Maria De Leon MD

A Year in the Parkinson’s Diva Life: By Maria De Leon

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A woman is strong because she has been weak; she is beautiful because she knows her own faults; and lives without fear because once she was afraid.”

Carolina Herrera

As we draw near the end of another year, I am prone to reflect on the good, the bad and the ugly that which has greatly impacted my life. Not everything that touches us or makes us who we are is necessarily good or at least not on the surface.

This year has been a year of great losses for many of us as well as great victories. Is my experience that these usually go hand in hand. The triumphs allow us to get through the sorrows and hardships while the devastating moments make the victories that much sweeter.

The year started strong with me finally getting better after last year’s pulmonary embolism and TIA (mini stroke) which took me nearly 6 months to fully recover.

Then it suddenly took a turn for the worst with my best friend being diagnoses with stage 4 cancer! a week after we had made all kinds of plans for the year…

Got to travel to DC see old friends, make new friends, and even meet a few celebrities such as MJFox while advocating for changes in public policy to improve research funding, and better more affordable health care at Capitol Hill.

Traveled to a new country with my husband and daughter and found the perfect city that made my hair look fabulous because there was no humidity. Who knew my hair could look good first thing in the morning?

After much prayer and seven long months of grueling chemotherapy and bone marrow transplant, my friend is finally cancer free- confirming that miracles still exist!

Saw two of my nieces and nephews graduate – one doing a master and one started college and i got to play the fun Tia (aunt) role throwing parties and even traveling with my niece to her new university. Since it all is connected somehow, I got to meet my new friends (Kate & Chris) at Health Union where I am now a contributing author on the health communities of  http://www.migraine.com and http://www.parkinsonsdisease.net; where I am cherishing the opportunity to work with like minded individuals who are just as passionate about making a difference in someones world.  For me doing something that I love doing aside from Parkinson is also a huge plus.

Let’s not forget that this year, we celebrated 200 year’s since Dr. James Parkinson annotated his observation on a disease we now call by his name. As such, I was a part of a huge campaign to bring PD awareness to the Hispanic community in this country by appearing on sites like Dr. Isabel show on Univision and was broadcasted around the country through the radio to several Spanish speaking station from Texas to Florida, Georgia and the Carolina’s. Plus, I now can boast of having two published books with my latest Spanish book on PD – Viviendo mas alla del parkinson was recently published.

Of course before the summer was over, I was down for over two months with a viral infection after seeing my doctor the day before, where he complimented my good health and said i did not need to see him till next year. Famous last words! this little viral infection caused me to miss my opportunity to travel to South Dakota. Fortunately, I was able to at least virtually meet a few of them including saying hi to my friends whom I like to call ‘the Mary’s!’

Lost an old friend and regained an old friend. But, as I was driving around the other day dropping off  and chauffeuring my daughter and classmates all over the place I realized is not such a bad life. Sure I can’t multitask to save my life, can’t remember even my own name a couple of hours after taking amantadine or even where I opened a bank account – “at some bank on a corner street”, I told my husband. “Which corner?”, he asked extremely perplexed since there is one in nearly every corner. “I don’t know,” I said. “I am pretty sure I will know when I see it.” Not comforting words to my husband or any other man.

I get frustrated easily and my goodness the heat is unbearable dripping droplets of water from my forehead on a regular basis but not a drop of fat lost- husband’s theory is that my body is conserving its nutrients because I seem to go into starvation mode for a few days at a time when my gastroparesis is at its peak. At any rate, I have learned to appreciate my curves and the moments when I am totally ‘me’ feeling as good as any young healthy person would – for which my husband has dubbed my life as the Curious Case of Maria D. When I am on top of my game and not choking on my own saliva and not  tripping over myself or running over the garage- I seem to be getting younger and stronger in his eyes!

Perhaps, I am not afraid of PD because I was once consumed with fear of the unknown; it no longer has a strong hold over me. Thanks to PD, I have learned to be more forgiving of mine and others shortcomings and have learned when to rely on my strengths and when to ask for help because I am weak- which happens a lot. I constantly get inspiration from strong, independent, beautiful, intelligent Hispanic Women who happen to be icons in their own fields such as Isabel Allende, Carolina Herrera. i identify with the latter because she began her career  in her 40’s, at an age when I too had to make a new transition in my life from physician/clinician to writer/motivational speaker and most important of all patient advocate.  And like her, I believe that fashion is an outward expression of ourselves free and unencumbered. But, the best garment any woman can wear is knowledge.

Aside from all this things for which I am truly grateful,  one of the greatest gifts and joys has been able to share my journey with all of you.

Thank you & Happy Holidays to everyone!

XOXO

@copyright2017

all rights reserved by Maria De Leon

3 Tips to Making the Most of the Holidays: By Maria De Leon

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“People change when they realize they have the potential to change things.” Paulo Coelho

Here we are again approaching what many people feel is one of the most stressful periods of the year although its intention by design is to be one of a joy. Adding a chronic illness to the mix can make things more volatile even in the best of circumstances.

As a neurologist, this was always the season I dreaded because I knew that I would have to take care of many sick people whose depression, loneliness, hopelessness, and general stress invariably exacerbated an underlying chronic illness causing them to decompensate.

In order to avoid this scenario- the following should be considered.

Have a plan

This means you have to be realistic about your health and family situation. If traveling is difficult ask members of family to come over to your place instead. If this causes too much chaos or is not feasible for others to travel either then consider gathering with close friends or a smaller gathering with loved ones.

As most of us that live with chronic illnesses will attest to the fact that mornings are usually not our best time. So don’t kill yourself trying to have everything ready by lunch time. Take your time, and ask to meet later in the day when you are more likely to be at your best to enjoy the fellowship. Focus on fewer but more meaningful interactions. This way if you have trouble speaking you can more easily focus on one on one conversation. Make sure to maintain eating and medication schedule throughout the holidays.

Do things that make you Happy

This year my family and I have decided that instead of rushing to see other relatives, not knowing how I will feel that day while feeling pressured not to let anyone down especially since those members have schedule constraints, we will leisurely arise and enjoy a meal at home. I love watching the Macy’s parade, this year I plan to enjoy it in my p.j.’s sipping some hot cocoa with my daughter and nephew by my side.

Rethink the Big Picture

Before you commit to anything, ask yourself what are the pros and cons of doing whatever it is you are doing? Will these activities give you purpose and joy or leave you more frustrated and worn out? Or worse cause you to decompensate physically? Having a clear purpose in mind can be extremely gratifying as well as help reduce stress and burden brought on by PD. My main purpose now is spending as much time as possible with my daughter who will be leaving for college soon. Making her happy and enjoying her company is my principal motivator for making this season the best ever.

Find your purpose to enjoy the holidays this season which will leave you not only with great memories but a sense of well-being.

BEST GIFTS ARE THE ONES THAT SPARKLE!!!! So let your inner DIVA sparkle this holiday season!

 

Painting by Ross Webb

@copyright 2017

all rights reserved by Maria De Leon