3 Tips to Making the Most of the Holidays: By Maria De Leon

Leave a comment Standard

“People change when they realize they have the potential to change things.” Paulo Coelho

Here we are again approaching what many people feel is one of the most stressful periods of the year although its intention by design is to be one of a joy. Adding a chronic illness to the mix can make things more volatile even in the best of circumstances.

As a neurologist, this was always the season I dreaded because I knew that I would have to take care of many sick people whose depression, loneliness, hopelessness, and general stress invariably exacerbated an underlying chronic illness causing them to decompensate.

In order to avoid this scenario- the following should be considered.

Have a plan

This means you have to be realistic about your health and family situation. If traveling is difficult ask members of family to come over to your place instead. If this causes too much chaos or is not feasible for others to travel either then consider gathering with close friends or a smaller gathering with loved ones.

As most of us that live with chronic illnesses will attest to the fact that mornings are usually not our best time. So don’t kill yourself trying to have everything ready by lunch time. Take your time, and ask to meet later in the day when you are more likely to be at your best to enjoy the fellowship. Focus on fewer but more meaningful interactions. This way if you have trouble speaking you can more easily focus on one on one conversation. Make sure to maintain eating and medication schedule throughout the holidays.

Do things that make you Happy

This year my family and I have decided that instead of rushing to see other relatives, not knowing how I will feel that day while feeling pressured not to let anyone down especially since those members have schedule constraints, we will leisurely arise and enjoy a meal at home. I love watching the Macy’s parade, this year I plan to enjoy it in my p.j.’s sipping some hot cocoa with my daughter and nephew by my side.

Rethink the Big Picture

Before you commit to anything, ask yourself what are the pros and cons of doing whatever it is you are doing? Will these activities give you purpose and joy or leave you more frustrated and worn out? Or worse cause you to decompensate physically? Having a clear purpose in mind can be extremely gratifying as well as help reduce stress and burden brought on by PD. My main purpose now is spending as much time as possible with my daughter who will be leaving for college soon. Making her happy and enjoying her company is my principal motivator for making this season the best ever.

Find your purpose to enjoy the holidays this season which will leave you not only with great memories but a sense of well-being.

BEST GIFTS ARE THE ONES THAT SPARKLE!!!! So let your inner DIVA sparkle this holiday season!

 

Painting by Ross Webb

@copyright 2017

all rights reserved by Maria De Leon

Things that Send a Chill Down my Spine: By Maria De Leon

Comment 1 Standard

” If  you are reading this than you are blissfully unaware of what is behind you (or rather in front of us).” ~unknown

As we approach the end of October and many are beginning to get excited about Halloween, I begin to ponder on all the scary and crazy things we have gone through this year. This year seems like nature brought about the biggest scares with hurricane after hurricane and wild fire after wild fire leaving many homeless, destitute and without medical care to boot.

Many of us may still be reeling from the personal losses we might have endured this year while having to contemplate our mental and physical well being with great trepidation as we go into a new medicare enrollment period (since most of us with chronic illnesses are under this program).

I fear for the future of  the community of chronically ill and disabled individuals (e.g. Parkinson’s patients) as it seems no one is really looking out for them. All year there have been many attempts to alter the present health care laws. Although,  supposedly these were meant to improve current policies in reality all proposal have fallen short of  their intended goal -helping the sick and poor. Fortunately, most have been rejected but no real progress has been made in this arena.

Now, the new passing of bill failing to revive subsides for poor may bring a whole host of new issues especially for states with a large number of indigent and people on medicaid as is the state of Texas. some experts are now claiming that “President Trump’s decision to cancel key ObamaCare payments could be backfiring” by bringing into effect the laws of supply and demand forcing patients to shop around for better deals.

However, this reasoning is fret with dangers since we are talking about an elderly, sick, and in many cases poorly educated population who have neither the time, the skills, or the savvy-ness to know that there may be better plans out there. While for those of us like me who are able to and know about these options it is still a huge ordeal that requires countless man hours to determine what is the best plan considering all the medical issues and number of medications I take.  Plus, when you change plans, there is always a risk that a doctor whom you are well established with will not take that particular insurance. As it has happened to me and many others when changing insurance due to enormous premiums i am now forced to see my specialists out of network costing me even higher out of pocket expenses. One does not always have this liberty one due to increase expense for seeing out of network specialist and two  there may not even be a specialist in your area covered by your plan. This is one of the biggest reasons teleneurology for Parkinson’s needs to be allowed to be covered across state lines.

Also, even if a person with much labor could get a better deal in insurance premiums, there is no guarantee that the medications one needs to function will be covered. As we get sicker and more disabled we are less able to cope with all these changes and regulations making it harder for chronically ill to stay insured and receive adequate benefits. My insurance has already informed me that my premiums were tripling for next year- which means need to find new insurance but it is with heavy heart I have to undertake this because i finally got insurance after 8 months to cover the medications that I need. so i am not looking forward to having to battle this issue again. because it is easier to stay with current plan when you have so many things going on like trying to survive a chronic illness, i see these new changes in the law as causing bigger problems to the infirm.

Getting rid of medicare part D would greatly improve things in my opinion. Ever since this was introduced i saw a huge increase in my patients having exacerbation of their once stable illnesses as well as increased hospitalization due to the fact that many like me who take a lot of expensive medications reach the gap within first 2-3 months of the year leaving them with a choice between medicine or paying other essential bills. in the past prior to this law, most doctors including myself were able to help out patients by providing samples or finding resources to meet the needs. But, once part D came into effect these options were taken away.

So in effect the uncertainty of my illness for upcoming year along with all the healthcare changes coming our way are more frightening and terrifying than most things I can imagine especially since like many others I am part of the  sandwich generation. I not only have to worry about my own decaying health but have to take care of several infirm elderly parents and raise a child.

Thus, I urge everyone to contact their state representatives regarding need for teleneurology and improvement in access to health care and ability to maintain our own physicians and right to have the medicines prescribed by our healthcare professionals.

In conclusion, this Halloween let’s ‘use our imagination not to scare ourselves to death’ but to inspire us to pursue those things which are worthy of our time and resources for a better, healthier life with PD (and any other chronic illness).

Happy Halloween everyone!  Eat drink and be spooktacular!hall

Sources:

Sullivan, Peter. (Oct 27 2017) Trump Obamacare may bolster law

Judge rejects bid by 18 US states to revive ACA subsidies Reuters health Info Oct 25 2017

 

@copy right 2017

all rightsd reserved by Maria De Leon

 

 

Singing the “blues” away: by Maria De León

Comment 1 Standard

 

“If you are feeling BLUE try painting yourself a different COLOR!” -Hannah Cheatam

We all have episodic feelings of the blues, feeling blah or meh; but how we cope and deal with these feelings are as crucial to our happiness and well being as air itself.

The other day after being sick for nearly 3 weeks, I was finally on my way to feeling physically better. However, my emotional state did not seem to have received the memo. I awoke completely refreshed physically and energized for a new day  but I was just feeling blah inside. Perhaps, I was now crashing after having been so hi on steroids.  Whatever the reason my insides were not matching my outside was not as important as figuring out to how to overcome that feeling of  genuine indifference.  Yet, despite this general lack of care, I had a little voice inside of me that kept playing the words… “tell you what I want, what I really really want..” (Spice Girls- Wannabe) before I knew it  I was uttering words out loud without much feeling initially.blue ocean

I was not about to let the feeling of nonchalance get in the way of  enjoying the gorgeous cool sunny day. So I opted to start singing softly at first then louder. Since I was not particularly feeling happy, I began to think of songs with the word ‘blue’ in the title and thus began my recovery to actually feeling happy inside. After singing a few lyrics from such songs like blue velvet, blue Christmas, my brown eyes blue, blue bayou, blue moon,  and blue (da ba dee da ba daa), I actually began to feel happy and dance moving shoulders, head and hips. My ‘blue’ song repertoire took a turn for a more upbeat selection beginning with Pharrell’s Happy song.

As Bob Marley once said, ‘music when it hits you it goes straight to the soul.’ I discovered that music in its purest form can express that which is silent within us  and in doing so it can lift our mood  by releasing a cascade of happy chemicals starting with dopamine.

In less than half a day I was dancing singing and feeling whole and myself again.

So next time you too feel like everything is blue and all you want to do is shrug your shoulders and throw your arms up in the air because the meh feelings have taken over start humming and singing even if it’s a few chords of sad, depressing blue songs and move to a more up beat repertoire and before you know it you too can beat the ‘blues’ trough song. May be we can start with “you don’t owe me” Parkinson’s and go slowly (despacito) from there.

Copyright@2017

all rights reserved Maria De Leon

“How Do You Solve a Problem like Maria?”: by Maria De Leon

Leave a comment Standard

When life gives you lemons -you make lemon meringue pie…

For the last few weeks, i have been so excited about going to South Dakota to a Parkinson’s retreat in an abbey and all i could think was ..running up a hill singing “the hills are alive with the sound of music…” from one of my all time favorite musicals and beloved character because it not only happens to bear my name sake but is the first movie i recall seeing with my grandfather as a child in Mexico.

But as usual, when I get too excited about something as of late PD always rears its ugly head. so perhaps i should have written how do you solve a problem like PD?

That’s the million dollar question, although no solution as of yet we have to still find a way to make margaritas, pies, lemonade and whatever else you can think with the citric juices of lemons that sometimes having a chronic illness leaves us with.

Although, the theory of PD being immunological is not proven, I am a firm believer that at least in those of us with LLRK2 phenotype do seem to have a higher propensity for getting immune based illnesses like UC ( Ulcerative Colitis),  and other immune mediated disease like thyroiditis and diabetes. ever since i been diagnosed with PD my immune system has been more chaotic than ever leaving me more and more prone to any and all viruses and bacteria circulating about which for the average healthy person would not even have a minimal reaction. But for me a common viral upper respiratory infection it leads to a whole cascade of problems and a new one this time around.

As all of you who live with PD and other chronic illnesses very well know it takes twice as long to recoup from any minor illness than normal people do. One way i have learned to cope with this is make sure start treatments ASAP, drink lots of fluids, rest and take extra vitamins, and levodopa to decrease length of illness which typically works fine. this was the strategy since i got sinusitis infection over 10 days ago knowing full well that i have a huge list of commitments and especially looking forward to traveling to see old friends, meet new ones and run up the hill although with the cough and bronchitis I developed i figured i would be more like a slow crawl. nevertheless, I was optimistic surely I would be all back to normal in more than 10 days time.

Well, little did I know that Maria an unsolvable problem by itself combined with my old pal Parkinson’s would come in to wreak as much havoc on me as it did in Puerto Rico. I am always amazed how many new symptoms of PD I am discovering as a patient that I never knew as a doctor specializing in this disease. I have treated many a MS, stroke, and spinal cord injury patient with dysautonomia- in other words dysregulation of the autonomic system. This is where a mild or seemingly innocuous event like a viral infection can trigger a whole host of responses from the body worst than infection itself. typical triggers are dehydration and bladder infection. Even in the multi system atrophy (MSA) patients who commonly have this problem, have I ever seen such an exaggerated response.

In Parkinson’s patients the dysautonomia is usually confined to abnormal functioning of bladder. But, never in my years of treating patients have I seen a full blown decompensation of organs which are regulated by autonomic system..means all the organs which secrete substances like the pancreas, heart, bladder, sweat glands, gut and so on. So i am experiencing horrific chest pain , breathing problems with increasing mucous production, severe palpitations, increased heart rate, nausea, increased tremors, and profuse sweating. Even though I am freezing to death feeling like I am inside an ice box. so in the middle of 80 degree weather, I am looking ridiculous, as per my daughter, because  on top of all my layers of clothing I have a coat and walking around with a faux fur blanket trying to keep warm. Plus, I am trying to keep my sugar from dropping by forcing down food.

When patients with this problem have an infection they have an exaggerated response of dealing with infection as was my case- having higher fever, increased exaggerated sweating, chills and rigors. But, interestingly and another one for the books is that my cold symptoms were much more unilateral making me think i had a thalamic stroke (organ in brain involved in temperature regulation) or a lesion in my spinal cord. but, after consulting with 2 other movement disorder specialist we came to conclusion it was most likely the PD; although never seen as affecting one side more than another- hence unsolvable Maria problem.

But, as I am always an optimist, I feel that my misadventures have once again left me with a new lesson to impart to all my fellow Parkinson’s patients. should you ever have this problem – don’t panic. But, if having symptoms need to talk to doctor ASAP because it can potentially be life threatening. We treat symptomatically.  This means lots of hydration, high salt diet, head elevation, sometimes requires iv fluid replacement and medications to increase blood pressure like midrodine, flurocortisone.

And of course treat underlying cause which triggered problem in my case upper respiratory infection.

On the positive side, I am hoping that all the sweating has shrunk my waist line a bit or at least partially counteract the effects of the steroids given to me – which thankfully helped to increase my blood pressure and my sugars to prevent me from crashing.

So instead of running a a hill– i will stay home and do conferencing via skype discussing how to solve a problem like me and pd.

 

Source:

To learn more about dysautonomia go to…

  1. ninds.nih.gov/disorders/dysautonomia/dysautonomia.htm

 

 

 

Do it with passion or not at all: By Maria De Leon

Comments 5 Standard

“It takes a glacier about a year to move, but eventually it carves out canyons.” Perseve(red)

Since the time of Ancient Greece, a life full of passion was one worth living well. Whether or not the ancients had eulogies at funeral is unclear. However a man’s life might still have been measured on what drove him- the amount of  passion or ‘pathos’ he possessed – that which made him go all in. In other words, what is it that makes us fearless in pursuit of what sets our souls on fire? For me, I have 3 passions God, my family and Neurology in particular working with those who live with Parkinson’s in their lives.yo y mi libro diva

In the last few weeks my love for PD has been fueled as I have traveled north to drop off my niece at college.  I got the opportunity to meet various Parkinson’s advocates like Chris and John from Philadelphia who graciously opened their hearts and their homes to me and my family for an enchanting evening of conversation and entertainment. I also had the great pleasure of meeting two wonderful people Kate and Chris part of a great social media medical community of Health Union who not only have shared their passions with me but granted me an opportunity to continue my passion for writing about the things I love while helping the PD and migraine communities. Plus, I am super excited that my Spanish book on “living beyond PD” (Viviendo más allá del Parkinson) will finally be making its debut in the next 4 weeks. Plus, I am always completely at awe and stoked to be able to come to you in this humble way to share my life with you so as to provide a ray of hope and sunshine because no matter how strong we are we all need to be loved and cared for. We need each other because we all have days when all the digging and struggling only makes us more muddled.me chris and stephanie

However, as I have fallen many times flat on my face and risen again to fight another day, I have confirmed once again that having and living with a chronic illness like PD does not have to decrease our interest for living, succeeding and dreaming. Life is what you make of it -weather we live with an illness or not have Parkinson’s or something else we all have struggles, hardships, and traumatic events which can propel us forward to a better tomorrow or crush us if we let it.  I have been given the opportunity to travel to South Dakota to do a weekend retreat at an abbey for those who care for someone with Parkinson’s as well as for PD patients which will include exercise classes, and educational classes to teach other the skills of living well beyond their own limitations brought on by the disease.me john chris

Please don’t let the shock and pain you are experiencing g today make you numb for the rest of your life. Even if you got nothing left, find your purpose maybe start by reaching out to your neighbor or friend who has less than you. The storm brings forth character, integrity, honesty especially when comfort is removed. The first step in sorting g over or getting back up is up to us. So, don’t wait for others to rescue you first, rather make your first step in improving your situation and others will join in to help. Remember none of us can do it all alone or know it all. But everyone knows something, can contribute something to our lives. So go ahead and start small. Who care how it looks? Ask for help when needed. When I first began this journey I could not even walk had to use a walker then a cane. I needed help to do most activities including dressing myself. This is not a race or a competition but it is about being empowered and finding yourself  as you push through the darkness into the light as you find your purpose, your own passion that will make you defy all the odds and come out victorious. But the driving force can’t be just anything – it has got to be BIG enough, strong enough and powerful enough to propel you forward.

What drives you today to keep moving? Do you have the passion to go all in and fight as if your life depended on it because it does?

sources:

Be Inspi(red): words of Hope and courage 2007 by Hallmark Licensing Inc.

@Copy right  2017; all rights reserved Maria De Leon

The cost of Parkinson’s and other chronic illnesses…

Leave a comment Standard

 

Although, fortunately the new health reform bill was turned down last night we as patients still face the uncertainty of what the future healthcare system will bring reform will bring. Thus, we strive to have members of congress understand what it means to live with a chronic illness and deal with the financial burden it places not just on the patients and families. More importantly, society as a whole can suffer if there is no assistance for the growing number of people living longer with chronic illnesses like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, and cancer to mention a few. As I give thanks to God for the miracle of modern medicine and His Grace which has brought healing to my best friend, I reflect on the issues of healthcare. And as she begins her slow recovery from recurrent metastatic stage 4 cancer which was wide spread, I ponder not only on the toll the illness has left on her body, her family, the relationships but also the enormous financial burden it has placed on them after 8 months of hospitalization, numerous bone marrow transplants, labs, testing and the slew of chemotherapeutic agents not counting the number of specialists and other ancillary staff.  The toll that the cost of medicines takes on a family or individual can be insurmountable. Unfortunately, this is also a place where few people ever come back or recover from. Not only is the sudden realization that our health is not under our control but the daunting reality of having to live a progressive illness as many of us like myself lose their livelihoods and ability to continue working can be far too overwhelming.

The grave reality is that financial factors play a major role in patient’s use of medications and subsequently sadly the patient’s outcome with a disease process. I have seen this first hand as a patient, doctor and caregiver. Sometimes, we don’t think about the financial issues at the onset of illness since our priority is to get well; but as the disease progresses and the time from diagnosis extends, this is the most critical factor in a person’s long term outcome for which many of us are ill prepared and as physicians don’t provide adequate guidance and support. I summit that low incomes and poor finances along with lack of access to medicines and treatments is the number one cause for patients and families demise and dissatisfaction with disease rather than the lack of treatments. I have heard time and time again from both patients and doctors the frustration in their voices in regards to lack of coverage of much needed medications. Unfortunately because always have to revert to the “cheaper” treatments the options become quite limited and not always offer the best outcome.

As I prepared another talk about the 200 years of Parkinson’s and the latest discovery and treatments options I was reminded by the people in the audience to whom I have addressed in past conferences. Most elderly, Medicare on fixed incomes who cannot afford the luxury of paying  high premiums for newer medications even if they do promise  to be more effective, with fewer side effects or prolong quality of life decrease disability and so on.

Looking at other patients with chronic illnesses, especially cancer patients are at risk of filing for bankruptcy due to severe financial burden but what is most interesting is that those who file for bankruptcy in context of chronic illness are at greater risk for having an early demise. Un fortunately, I have seen it firsthand particularly those who are young and don’t have the financial stability that an older person might have from years of productive labor hence are more likely to forego treatments or seek alternate remedies as in the Hispanic communities because of lack of monetary resources and lack of access to health care because of poor or no insurance coverage.  And even when the chronically Ill are over 65 and on Medicare, the restrictions placed by an outside third party who does not understand the intricacies of a complex illness such as Parkinson’s can tie the hands of the healthcare practitioners. Forcing patients to use less effective treatments or older treatments or asking doctor to find the cheapest medication which in the case of Parkinson’s is levodopa/ carbidopa. Although it still remains the gold standard, 50 years’ experience has shown us that this medication alone is fraught with side effects when used as a sole treatment option increasing likelihood of dyskinesia’s and subsequent decline in quality of life.

We cannot allow our chronically Ill to continue to undergo increased financial toxicity due to lack of government support. We must stand up and ask our representatives to continue to provide support for those who are chronically ill and not remove benefits for those with preexisting conditions and improve access to healthcare especially much needed drug treatments.

Some of the questions you might want to have early on with doctor when diagnosed with a chronic illness is referral to social worker, and to lawyers  experts in chronic diseases for financial planning including long term care for spouses or caregivers.

When discussing medications ask the price but also price benefit ratio. Don’t simply ask for a cheaper drug which might result in more adverse effects causing more hospitalizations and more doctors’ visits or side effects than a more expensive medication which in the long run would be more cost effective to keep you stable and also avoid the inherent confusion many have by having different generic brands for same medicine. (In my experience, the varying colors and shapes of same medicine gets patients confused by making them believe they are different especially in the elderly).  Ask if there is a less expensive treatment option that is equally effective.

Are there any nonprofit organizations or community organizations that can aid with burden of Drug cost. Also inquire what about any drug programs from companies – different companies have different philosophies in regard to helping patients.

But also important to note that many drugs used in neurology to treat many non-motor symptoms are off label but widely accepted among the community physicians to treat certain causes but with the new restrictions of Medicare. Previously employed medicines maybe denied leaving you stranded …I am in a quandary at this point with one of my meds. Discuss with your physician have them appeal if denied or find other appropriate alternatives. Don’t just suffer because insurance denied or medicine is expensive.

Here is a foundation where some of you might find assistance Patient Advocate Copay relief -1-866-512-3861. Also look at NORD. http://www.patientassistanceprograms.com

 

@ July 2017 All rights reserved Maria De Leon MD

 

 

 

 

 

3 Rules to Avoid Confrontation with your Partner when Chronically ill: By Maria De Leon

Leave a comment Standard

The good and the bad mix themselves so thoroughly in our thoughts, even in our aspirations, that we must look for excellence Anthony Trollope, He knew He was Right

Most of us marry someone who is our opposite which is what makes us work as a team by bringing different assets and points of views into the relationship. However, if 3 important rules are not established or discussed, as we get diagnosed with a chronic illness or as Parkinson’s progresses (in my case), there maybe a build up of resentment, quiet seething, and increasingly snide remarks along with looks that could kill if given half a chance.  So, instead of working as a team our contrasting ideas, and managerial styles can lead to friction which can pull us apart by making us feel alienated; as if we were working alone towards different goals.

I have seen this over and over in many patients and friends who both feel as if the other did not care when it fact both are committed to achieving the same goal- well being of the patient and stable, happy marriage. For instance, a wife after suffering a devastating illness in which she has practically been hospitalized for nearly 6 months has left her completely devoid of any will power physically, emotionally, and spiritually she is at the border of giving up from pure exhaustion. What she needs is complete rest and time to process everything she has gone though without anyone fussing over her. Yet, her fears are making her clingy and desperate putting her husband on edge. Husband recognizes depression and her need to talk to someone so he asks doctor for a counselor to help but she refuses the much needed intervention.  His managerial style is to find a solution to her beloved wife’s problem depression which is causing her to not eat and wither away more. After being by her side day in and day out through out the entire ordeal, he too is in desperate need of respite.

Sometimes because of different ways of approaching the situation it may appear instead to the other person that the partner has either given up or does not care. When these sentiments begin to build up inside of a relationship, especially one that has endured much already, is a sign that you are reaching a dangerous zone. A frustration like a patient refusal to adhere to doctor’s orders, or to loved ones wishes for their own well being as the case above, can spark a fire and unleash a fury causing at times a twenty year marriage to implode on itself. Then we are left alone to pick up the pieces  and deal with our illness at the same time through lenses of disillusion.

The epiphany– sometimes a feeling of neglect and betrayal we feel from our spouse is more about us than them. We have to start peeling the layers back one by one before we are confronted with our own insecurities and fears. This will lead to self discovery and understand what we are really upset about. Since, as Maya Angelou wrote “tragedy (chronic illness), no matter how sad, becomes boring to those not caught in its addictive caress.”  Thus, at some point in our lives we have to confront adversity all by ourselves. when you do, remember that Healing is a life long process which starts by being kind to yourself.  You must love yourself before you can love others fully. I pray that you discover this before you lose something more valuable. In our struggle to survive living with a disease or trauma which has greatly impacted our lives is to focus on the “cure” (be healed). Sometimes, sadly as it may occur with cancer patients or trauma victims, physical healing can take place only to expose our deepest darkest fears leaving us emotionally and spiritually devoid.

I have discovered that ironically the best way to heal completely and be free to live life to the fullest is to let go of the idea of finding a quick fix. The answers is not on the outside rather within us and it takes time. Many people go through therapies and treatments like yoga, bicycling, mindfulness, pharmaceuticals, acupuncture, etc. as if by partaking in these we will eventually reach a point where we can say I am finally – completely healthy and cured (from whatever ails us)!

Not so. This is not the end of the world or us for that matter. Not only is it okay to not be perfectly healed since it reflects life as it truly is- imperfect. We are a work in progress.

Instead on focusing on the bad- focus on the good and learn to compromise. Learn to let go of resentments and things that don’t nourish the soul, give you joy, or strength.

Remember, when dealing with an illness like in any relationship 3 rules apply:

#1 Neither one is going to be entirely comfortable all the time–  we are all unique individuals, thank goodness if everyone was like me it would be very chaotic. The pendulum is always swinging back and forth in any good relationship- is a give and take – if one person is always in control then there are bigger issues with poor boundaries that need to be addressed.

#2 Decide upon a philosophy to tackle the illness – this does not mean you are not free to make decision as the situation arises on the spare of the moment -simply means you have an agreed upon common goal-

#3 There can only be one driver at a time– I am sure you are all familiar with the saying “too many cooks spoils the broth.” But, in order to enjoy the drive whatever the scenic route may be, there must be trust that the person in charge of steering will get you to the right destination safe.

Now, you can start living life with the fullest not dwelling on the past, focusing on the future but living the here and now. embrace life do things because they nourish you, they make you a better person not because you are trying desperately to be healed. always be grateful for what you have and the people around you who are willing to stay by your side and support you and share your journey victories and defeats.

Have a blessed week everyone!Image result for Dancing Quotes About Life

Sources:

Spiegel Amy, “Letting go of Perfect: women expectations and authenticity.” Foreword Smith, Angie. B&H Publishing Group, Nashville,TN  2012

Harvey, Cig  (Aug. 2017): “Let it Go.” The Oprah Magazine, Vol 18 (8): 92-103

Copyright@2017

All Rights Reserved Maria De Leon