Food for Thought on the Future of Health Care: by Maria De Leon

Now that the new president has been elected, politics aside, I am a bit excited and hopeful about the possibility of new, much needed in my opinion, healthcare changes.

As a physician and patient I have seen the drastic changes and not for the better, I might add, brought on by the recent year’s Health Care laws. These atrocious laws began targeting the medical practice since I was in medical school but only worsened in last several years culminating in a complete overhaul affecting the lives of millions of patient’s as well. As a physician, I have met only a handful of people whose’ ‘Affordable Health Care Act’ (AHCA) actually benefited while the majority of people like myself have only suffered. This is not even mentioning the breakdown in the establishment of medicine as we knew.

I don’t think I am alone when I say we need change desperately!

The first sign that that things were going array was the continues reduction of payment imposed by government on doctors with an increase intrusion of the government into how doctors practice medicine insisting on many new requirements such as electronic records-EMR (which are extremely expensive to buy and maintain to say the least) before they would compensate for our services and time. Thy also try to impose how we practiced medicine by attempting to dictate what medicines we should use on our patients .No other sector of society would tolerate such intrusions and governmental dictation on how to practice trade not related to government. Subsequently because of increased paper work and requirements doctors have been forced to increase their patient volume just to maintain their overhead and make a living. This, however, has created much discontent among patients because now (we) have to wait longer hours (even longer than previously) and be seen even shorter time because the demands on doctors time has tripled and quadrupled (especially in neurology where many physicians have left the field altogether) plus their need to make a living. Before I sold my practice, at the beginning of all these changes I was already forced to hire more clerical workers just to keep up with the demand of paperwork imposed on us. This alone was extremely stressful because it meant working longer hours just to come out barely even at times.

The increased wait time at doctor’s office or to be given an appointment by a physician especially a specialist like an MDS has created immediate discontent in all involved; but mostly in us patients who fail to see the big picture and attribute all problems in medicine to the only person we see- the doctor. 

For us patients feeling like we are not as important with the ever increasing impersonal settings with little eye contact and minimal physical interaction due to the constant need for doctors eyes to be focused on the machines required to document things and send prescriptions leaves a bad taste in our mouths particularly when already feeling scared, vulnerable and ill increasing our feelings of distrust and discontent towards our health care providers who are only human and trying their very best to tend to our needs while feeling multiple internal and external pressures. So please try to put yourselves in their shoes before exploding and feeling as if your time and your personal needs are not being taken into account.

Furthermore, the fact that prescriptions are now almost required by all pharmacies to be emailed can be another off -putting experience at the doctor’s office especially when computers fail. Dealing with equipment failure in our offices is not part of our training when it relates to EMR, which invariably happen much more than you think, is extremely frustrating and costly. Dealing with these government imposed issues of technology serve only to detract from the time spent with patient greatly impacting the patient –physician relationship. And in this society which demands immediate satisfaction for our needs, a one chance encounter is nearly doomed to failure with such high expectations from our parts.

Two personal Examples of technology deeply affecting the patient-doctor relationship are the following scenarios 1) when I was in practice my computer system crashed and took nearly a week to fix so my staff and I had no idea who was scheduled for following day to call to remind of their appointments; but worst we had no idea who would be showing up to our office. So not only did we not have charts ready (thank God no EM records yet) but could not check on their lab results nor the benefits beforehand for new patients. But, at least we could pull the charts and make new ones when patients arrived. Needless to say this caused a lot of confusion, headaches, and delays to all involved. 2) Fast forward a few years later now as a patient, I went to visit my neurologist and her system was down at the university, she had no chart, no record of my tests ( fortunately I am always prepared and had my own copies) and could not email my meds. She spent half of her time trying to email my meds then finally had to write down in a separate sheet to call in or email later.  I could empathize with her pain and frustration. Knowing that she was dealing with this all day would probably leave something out so I called the office another day to remind staff of which meds I needed.

Thus, we find ourselves in a Catch 22- 

Compound these frustrations on the physicians side by fact that patients are getting sicker and using up more hospital visits because they can’t afford their medication, are in never ending donut hole, and no longer can have medication samples or assistance as easily as before Medicare part D was instituted. Patients no longer have continuity of care essential to successful treatment because they go from Doctor to Doctor therefore never building a good rapport along with a long term care plan essential for any chronic illness. Furthermore, many patients feel flabbergasted and bamboozled because the affordable care is an oxymoron. Moreover, the majority of patients and hardworking individuals are getting less and less for their money. We are paying higher premiums yet have access to fewer doctors, medications, ancillary specialists, and qualify for fewer diagnostic test. We are forced or pressured to see more physician assistants (PA’s) and Nurse practitioners (NP’s) if want to be seen sooner or closer to our homes which can be disappointing for many who expect to see an actual physician especially in regards to specialists. Yet, these patients unjustly are paying the same premiums although the insurances and government pay less for the services provided by these other providers.

Moreover, the government and insurance companies have tried to convince everyone, doctors and patients alike, that all medications (brand and generic) are equal. The result is that previously controlled patients now are having many more break through seizures, migraines, strokes, dyskenesias, hallucinations, and falls to name a few because the changes in medications are proven to be ineffective or are no longer taking medication as prescribed because cannot afford. In my experience 7/10 times these things along with hospitalization can be prevented if either the insurance companies (which now falls under the government umbrella since AHCA was passed) would simply allow us doctors to do our jobs. Sadly, unless something is done there is absolutely no need for new research or new medications if they are not to be used in the treatment of diseases like Parkinson’s. I am appalled at the new attitudes emerging in this country calling for less medication. Stating that chronic pain can be cured with exercise- obviously these people never had chronic severe pain and calling for no or fewer medications again – they have never been in our shoes with chronic illnesses. Since I cut down the dosage of my medications because of ill effects on my heart my heart is good but my PD symptoms are no longer controlled. Am I happy to be taking fewer meds yes! Am I happy that I feel like awful without it – absolutely not! Is not just the feeling but the limitations on my body imposed by my disease without medicines that I can’t tolerate and will find a way to blend the two so that I can function better for me and my families sake.

Another issue with our current healthcare system is the substitution of brand name medicines for generic ones, which was initially based on cost, makes absolutely no sense anymore in regards to patients needs because generic medications now cost as much or more as brand name medicines both requiring an enormous amount of paperwork from your physician and their staff just to allow us to have things we need to get along on a daily basis. My husband is prime example of how the system has failed many. He has severe cholesterolemia (critical numbers) which was well controlled for years until the new healthcare changes occurred. Our insurance plan first kept increasing the price of meds then refused to pay for them so came a long list of trial medication causing a slew of side effects one worse than the previous each time and not controlling his cholesterol which is sky high..(Only thing that gives me comfort is the longevity of life in His family) we are at the point that all meds which he needs have been denied and out of pocket cost is about thousand dollars per month along with the multiple high cost medications I need this is not feasible. Thus, he is now trying a variety of over the counter supplements while I am praying he does not have a fat emboli causing him to have a stroke or heart attack.

So as I said at the beginning, we desperately need reform in the way doctors and patients are viewed (rather valued) by our government/society. With new changes perhaps the field of neurology can once again flourish and tend to the needs of an ever growing elder population in which Parkinson’s disease plays a major role. One never knows if things change enough I would be happy and capable of rejoining the ranks of my fellow neurologists and MDS to help PD persons like me without having to worry how I will be able to pay for my overhead and employees salary causing my own illness to spin out of control dealing with the external unnecessary burdens which have sucked the life of those still in the practice of medicine including my husband’s. Although, I am aware that with any new scientific discoveries, making new health policies and /or making amendments to existing policies can be a slow process but one we should all strive to see happen for our health and that of our children.

 

Contact your state representatives as well as the public policy branch of the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s research and let them know your specific issues with accessing health care, getting medications and seeing MDS in your area. Change cannot occur without first admitting there is a problem.

 

 

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2 thoughts on “Food for Thought on the Future of Health Care: by Maria De Leon

  1. Maria, thank you. It is so frustrating. So far, I do not have any problems with my insurance and meds, other than the fact the Express Scripts has screwed up several times and left me without a med for a few days. and of course, insurance refused to pay for a rescue prescription. But my daughter’s insurance has almost doubled, with few benefits. If she wouldn’t be penalized for not having insurance, she would just give it up.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Sharon, thank you for comment.. I absolutely agree with your dilemma. I know many people who could not afford insurance last year so went without only to have a huge penalty imposed on them larger than the insurance cost making it even harder to afford the next time around especially with rising cost.. somehow this does not make sense to me.. keep the faith hopefully will see changes for the better soon.

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