Women & PD: by Maria De Leon

 

My thoughts regarding my life with Parkinson’s as an MDS  mirrors those of a great warrior when she quipped  “it feels as if this life is not my life. It is a second life. People have prayed to God to spare my life and I was spared for a reason. To help others”…(with the same struggles)- MalalaIMG_1996

 

It has been a couple of weeks since I wrote down my reflections and introspection; but for a change rather than musing out loud I have been amusing myself meeting so many wonderful, valiant women with PD around the country. These women from Hawaii to Arizona have inspired me to continue advocating for women all around the world. They are evidence that the well rooted common public opinion regarding women as the “weak” sex should be reconsidered. Especially, when it comes to the notion of how women living with Parkinson’s should act within the realm of this progressive degenerative illness. Yes, it is true that still we have a great deal of work to do when at least a third of the world still treats women as property and as second class citizens; yet among each culture and ethnic background we find examples of women who are courageous beyond measure who are willing to stand up not only for themselves but for others. Women like Malala who despite her young age, she was willing to put herself in harms ways in order to defy conventional wisdom and the abhorrent treatment of women in her country earning her the Nobel Peace even at such a young age. Her story reminds us that a strong voice in the midst of adversity and imperceptible roar cannot be silenced.IMG_2001

Although, we are not in this country by any means putting ourselves necessarily in the path of death, as some women in other parts of the world are, trying to alter common place treatment of women within the medical confines – still takes a certain amount of bravery. To go against the firmly held beliefs of the masses requires discipline, fortitude, and incredible conviction …

As we are on the heels of Parkinson’s awareness month- I want to  encourage all women who live with PD on a daily basis to remember that their story is also my own. Thus, I am not unique in any fashion or form all I do is encourage other women to become empowered with knowledge and become self advocates of their own destiny and health care. There is great power in togetherness and standing unified in a cause for the betterment of all women and their health issues with PD. No longer do you as a woman with PD should face challenges alone unique to your gender since half of the population is of female gender.

Things to remember about PD in women –IMG_1982

  • Women tend to be diagnosed at least two years later
  • Hormones play a role – since early hysterectomy increases the risk of PD but also women who are menstruating have worse symptoms of PD during their menses and their period alternatively worsens due to having Parkinson’s
  • Women experience more dyskenisias than men; this could be due to increase sensitivity to side effects as most women are more sensitive to similar doses given to men but also because of the weight difference (more body fat in women- causing medications to linger longer in body)  and metabolism difference.
  • Women have more depression and men have more behavioral problems
  • Women although have less dementia then men they have worst quality of life overall. Perhaps, because they also have increased risk of strokes.

However, there is an increase in hope since women are beginning to bond and find ways to support one another, lift each other up and  advocate together for changes in the diagnosis and treatment of women with PD. For this reason we are working on getting a women support round table at this year’s WPC in Portland. Let me know if you are planning on going!!

Soon we will have flyers that you can share with others regarding  the issues women with PD face. Two sources already  exists – one is with http://www.pdf.org  and “life in balance” a newsletter for people & families living with PD provided by Parkinson’s support solutions (Azilect program) issue 1-2016 – http://www.parkinsonssupportsolutions.com ; 1-866-880-8582

 Join the team. Together we can #endParkinsons.
 

 

 

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